Showing posts with label spiralized. Show all posts
Showing posts with label spiralized. Show all posts

Sunday, August 26, 2018

Spanish-ish Chickpea, Potato & Cauliflower Rice Soup with Saffron, Smoked Paprika & Salsa Brava for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

I fully expected to be at the least without power and at most without a roof or bailing out all kinds of water from my house this weekend with Hurricane Lane looming over us. We got lucky here on Oahu, at least and the storm both weakened and was downgraded and made a sudden turn away from us. It was a pretty scary few days though. Although I've lived here since 2001, this is probably the most worrisome storm watch I have experienced. Unfortunately, although Oahu came through pretty unscathed, Maui and especially the Big Island were not so lucky and took the hit, with the Big Island getting over 4-feet on rain in some spots. Lots of flood and wind damage, so please send your thoughts and prayers to those impacted.


I didn't really plan a soup, but I was craving something with a Spanish vibe since my friend Monina brought me back saffron and a bottle of tomato salsa brava from a recent trip. She mentioned the salsa was often used for potatoes there and so I decided to make them the base, adding chickpeas a few veggies, garlic, the saffron, and plenty of smoked paprika and cumin to my soup. Since I loved my addition of cauliflower rice to this Red Curry Vegetable and Cauliflower Rice Soup, I added some to this soup and added the remainder of a jar of pimentos I had in the fridge. I saved the salsa brava to drizzle on top.


Spanish-ish Chickpea, Potato & Cauliflower Rice Soup with Saffron, Smoked Paprika & Salsa
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Serves 6)

2 Tbsp olive oil
1 large yellow onion, chopped
2 medium carrots, chopped
2 celery stalks, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp ground cumin
2 tsp dried parsley
4 to 5 sprigs of fresh thyme
6 cups broth (I used no-salt no-chicken vegan bouillon)
2 large potatoes, chopped
2 cans or 4 cups of cooked chickpeas
3 cups frozen cauliflower rice
2 Tbsp pimentos, drained 
sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
salsa brava (optional)
  
Heat the olive oil in a large soup pot over medium heat.Add the onion, carrot and celery and saute for about 6 to 7 minutes, until veggies are softened. Add the garlic and saute for another minute, then add the smoked paprika, cumin, dried parsley and thyme sprigs and cook until fragrant.

Add the broth, potatoes, chickpeas, cauliflower rice and pimentos and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 20 minutes--until potatoes and veggies are tender but not mushy. Remove the thyme sprigs, pulling off any remaining leaves. Season to taste with sea salt and freshly ground pepper.

Serve in bowls, drizzled with salsa brava if desired.


Notes/Results: I loved this soup--so much great flavor on its own with the saffron, garlic, smoked paprika and cumin, and it's even better with the salsa brava stirred in as the spicy pepper and vinegar in it and depth and a little kick. Filling without being heavy, this soup will be delicious in my lunches this week. I will happily make it again. 


Lets take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen and see who is here.


 
Judy of Gluten Free A-Z Blog brought Instant Pot or Not Chilled Zucchini Corn Lime Soup and said, "Corn and zucchini are at their peak right now, and the duo are sensational in this light summer soup which can be eaten chilled or warm. Although this soup can be enjoyed warm or chilled, chilled seems to be my preference. I usually serve it warm for dinner and cold for lunch the next day. Either way it doesn't disappoint- The key ingredients for me is the fresh lime and crunchy sweet corn that I add to each soup bowl!"
 


Tina of Squirrel Head Manor shared her Chicken and Heavily Dijoned Sandwich and said, "I brought a chicken sandwich with lots of tomatoes and Dijon mustard. Typically I don't eat a sandwich for dinner but I was "inspired" by the last Frieda Klein novel when I read about this sandwich. It just made me want one. You know how that is - cravings. ... I like the Maille brand of Dijon, it has just the right amount spiciness."

 
Mahalo to Judee and Tina for joining in this week!
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:


  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).




Have a happy, healthy week!

Sunday, August 5, 2018

Red Curry Vegetable & Cauliflower Rice Soup with Crispy Hoisin-Sesame Tofu for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

Sometimes soup inspiration just strikes. I made this delicious Bengali Fish Curry earlier in week. I was heating up the leftovers and decided to dump the remains of a can of coconut milk into it. As I was enjoying the soupy curry with cauliflower rice, I thought about what a great soup it would make. 


At first I decided to make a vegan chicken cauliflower rice soup, but then I decided to use up some red curry paste and a bunch of summer veggies (zucchini, red pepper, tomatoes, eggplant, carrot, onion and snow peas) lurking in my fridge. Wanting to add protein, I made a variation to Chloe Coscarelli's Crispy Hoisin Tofu from her Vegan Ramen Bowl, and thus my Red Curry Vegetable & Cauliflower Rice Soup with Crispy Hoisin-Seasame Tofu was born.


Red Curry Vegetable & Cauliflower Rice Soup with Crispy Hoisin-Seasame Tofu
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Serve 4 to 5

1 Tbsp coconut oil or oil of choice
3 Tbsp red curry paste, or to taste 
2 lemongrass stalks, stalks trimmed and bruised
4 to 5 kaffir lime leaves, torn
1/2 sweet onion, sliced thinly
1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
1 medium zucchini, chopped
1 Japanese eggplant, halved and sliced
1 carrot, thinly sliced 
1 red jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely diced
1/2 Tbsp ginger, minced
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 cups low-sodium vegetable stock of choice
2 tsp low-sodium tamari or soy sauce, or to taste

3-4 cups riced cauliflower
1 large handful snow peas, ends trimmed and cut into thirds
2 Roma tomatoes, seeded and coarsely chopped
1 can (15 oz) coconut milk
fresh lime juice

To Serve: Crispy Hoisin-Sesame Tofu (recipe below), pea shoots, chopped green onion, Thai basil leaves, and lime wedges, as desired  

Heat a large soup pot over medium high heat and add coconut oil and red curry paste, cooking for a couple of minutes to release the flavors. Add the lemongrass, kaffir lime leaves and onions and saute for 3 to 4 minutes. Add the red bell pepper, zucchini, eggplant, carrot, ginger, and garlic and saute for another 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the broth and tamari and bring soup to a slow roiling boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes. Add the riced cauliflower, snow peas and coconut milk and simmer about 5 minutes until snow peas are tender crisp. Taste and add salt, or other seasoning (such as lime juice) as needed or desired.

To Serve: Ladle Soup into large bowls and top with Crispy Hoisin-Sesame Tofu, green onion, pea shoots, and Thai basil leaves as desired and serve with fresh lime wedges. Enjoy!

-----

Crispy Hoisin-Sesame Tofu 
Slightly Adapted from by Chloe Flavor by Chloe Coscarelli
(Serves 4)

2 Tbsp coconut oil
1 (16 oz) package extra-firm tofu, pressed (see note below) and cubed
1/4 cup hoisin sauce
1 Tbsp low-sodium tamari or soy sauce
1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds

Heat \the oil in a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil shimmers, add the tofu and sear for about 3 minutes per side, until it turns golden and crispy. (Chloe says the key to crispy tofu it not to flip them over too soon--to let them get nicely brown before turning them over.) Add more oil as needed if the pan looks dry. Add the hoisin sauce, tamari, and sesame seeds, reduce the heat to low and turn the tofu to coat it evenly.


Notes/Results: This bowl of soup with its Asian-inspired flavors really hit the spot. The cauliflower rice is a great, lower calorie and carb substitute to real rice and the tofu adds the right amount of chewy, meaty texture and flavor. I made this one vegan with veggies I had on hand and like, but you can adjust it easily with whatever you like--adding fewer or more ingredients and a different protein if you like. The red curry paste I use has a medium spice and with the jalapeno, it was the right heat level for me, but you can add more heat to the soup--or serve it with chili paste or sriracha if you like a bigger kick of spice. One note about the tofu--it is REALLY good and so I recommend making extra as like me, you may find your self noshing on it as you cook. I will happily make this soup again and will experiment with more cauliflower rice in soups. 


Lets take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen.


Debra of Eliot's Eats is here with Raw Butternut Squash Salad with Ginger & Raisins, She says, "I bragged during last month’s “In My Kitchen” about my beautiful squash plant and how it was loaded with lovely butternuts. Seriously, it wasn’t two days after that post that the entire vine withered away and died. (Squash bugs, perhaps?) Anywhoo, I was able to salvage half a dozen squashes. When I think of butternut squash, I think of fall….nice gratins, creamy soups, delicious pies and muffins. Definitely not salads. I wondered if you could eat it raw and after a couple of searches I came across some delicious sounding recipes: Raw Butternut Squash Salad with Ginger and Raisins by Mark Bittman and Fresh Butternut Squash Salad with prosciutto, Parmesan and walnuts by Marc Meyer.  Although I have to admit that the latter one sounded more delicious, I had everything to make the former one. So, Raw Butternut Squash Salad with Ginger it was."
 
 
Mahalo, Debra--for joining in this week!
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:

  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).

 
Have a happy, healthy week!




Wednesday, July 25, 2018

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "The Last Thing I Told You" by Emily Arsenault, Served with a Recipe for Zucchini Spaghetti with Pesto & Thyme Mushrooms

It's Wednesday and Hump Day and I'm happy to be today's stop on the TLC Book Tour for The Last Thing I Told You, a new mystery novel by Emily Arsenault. Accompanying my review is my take on a spaghetti dinner, Zucchini Spaghetti with Pesto & Thyme Mushrooms.



Publisher's Blurb:

From the acclaimed author of The Evening Spider and The Broken Teaglass comes this psychological thriller about the murder of a psychologist in a quiet New England town and his former patient whose unreliable thread will keep readers guessing until the shocking end.
 
I hear myself whispering. Not again. Not again.
 
Why did I ever come back here? Surely because of you. Because I thought of something I’d always meant to tell you. Because you were the only one I ever really wanted to tell it to…
 
Therapist Dr. Mark Fabian is dead—bludgeoned in his office.
 
But that doesn’t stop former patient Nadine Raines from talking to him—in her head. Why did she come back to her hometown after so many years away? Everyone here thinks she’s crazy. And she has to admit—they might have good reason to think so. She committed a shockingly violent act when she was sixteen, and has never really been able to explain that dark impulse—even to Fabian. Now that Fabian’s dead, why is she still trying?
 
Meanwhile, as Detective Henry Peacher investigates Fabian’s death, he discovers that shortly before he died, Fabian pulled the files of two former patients. One was of Nadine Raines, one of Henry’s former high school classmates. Henry still remembers the disturbing attack on a teacher that marked Nadine as a deeply troubled teen.
 
More shockingly, the other file was of Johnny Streeter, who is now serving a life sentence for a mass shooting five years ago. The shooting devastated the town and everyone—including Henry, who is uncomfortable with the “hero” status the tragedy afforded him—is ready to move on. But the appearance of his file brings up new questions. Maybe there is a decades-old connection between Nadine and Streeter. And maybe that somehow explains what Nadine is doing in Fabian’s office nearly twenty years after being his patient. Or how Fabian ended up dead two days after her return. Or why Nadine has fled town once again.
 
But as Nadine and Henry head toward a confrontation, both will discover that the secrets of people’s hearts are rarely simple, and—even in the hidden depths of a psychologist’s files—rarely as they appear.

Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (July 24, 2018)

My Review:

This is my third book by Emily Arsenault, having read In Search of the Rose Notes and reading and reviewing The Evening Spider for a book tour a couple of years ago. I need to read more of her work as she is an author who creates a good and often creepy vibe with her words. The Last Thing I Told You doesn't have the spooky vibe of the others I've read, but it shares similarities with a dual point-of-view and alternating time frames. Arsenault has crafted a twisty tale in answering the question of who killed Dr. Mark Fabian and how the crime may be related to the past of the two main characters--Henry Peacher, a police detective known for his heroic actions from a shooting at a retirement center five years ago, and Nadine Raines, Henry's former high school classmate who was a patient of Dr. Fabian after a violent incident with a teacher twenty years ago. Henry is trying to piece together who murdered the therapist, partially through two patient files the doctor pulled before his death--with Nadine's name on one of them. Nadine is back in town visiting her mother and stepfather and she's having conversations with the dead doctor in her mind. With her unresolved and troubled past, she is an unreliable narrator with her inner monologue and her suspicious actions after the murder. Both Nadine and Henry are interesting and well-drawn characters, each plagued by their pasts and I enjoyed the way the book unfolded insights into their personalities.

The Last Thing I Told You is not a quick read, or a pulse-pounder of a story--it is a slower moving and character-driven psychological drama rather than a true thriller, but it fascinated me as it unwound and had me guessing and second-guessing who the murderer might be. The tension and pace increase as the story moves along and there were a few good twists--some I saw coming and some I didn't. Overall, an interesting and compelling read that mystery and psychological drama and thriller fans who don't mind a deeper look at characters and a slower build, should enjoy.

-----

Author Notes: Emily Arsenault is also the author of The Broken Teaglass, In Search of the Rose Notes, Miss Me When I’m Gone, and What Strange Creatures. She lives in Shelburne Falls, Massachusetts, with her husband and daughter.
 
Find out more about Emily at her website and connect with her on Facebook.




-----

Food Inspiration:

The Last Thing I Told You is not a foodie book, but there were a few food and drink mentions like coffee, a gin cocktail, pearl onions, pumpkin pie, a picnic basket and macaroni salad (used as a simile for Nadine's anger), spaghetti dinner, bourbon, a Subway sandwich, Dunkin Donuts, mashed potatoes and turkey, carbonara, knishes, tres leches cupcakes, clafouti, sweet bread, cardamom crisps, oatmeal cookies, apple cider and tequila, pizza (mentioned about five times), Shiraz, butter cookies, popcorn, Sprite, omelets, hot chocolate, Fig Newtons, a turkey club, fried chicken, baby artichokes, orange juice, apples and carrots, sausages, KFC, iced guava juice, pasta salad with ham, cherry tomatoes and mayonnaise, and chocolate cake.


So it's been a stressful couple of weeks for a lot of reasons and although all of the baked goods mentioned sounded good, I didn't want to go down that path for my book-inspired dish--fearing I might not stop once a cookie or cupcake hit my taste buds. I am off of wheat and gluten for a while too, so although pizza seemed to be the meal of choice for several of the characters, I didn't want a traditional pizza. I saw a couple of recipes for no crust/cheese crust pizzas online (like this one) and thought that might be fun and it didn't require turning the oven on in this humid weather. I planned to top the mozzarella crust with with thyme mushrooms and pesto. Unfortunately, two tries did not result in a crisp cheese crust but instead a watery, gluey mess. It could have been my mood, it could have been my mozzarella (I did use fresh mozzarella as the recipe author said he did in the comments), or the pan, but regardless of the whys, it just was not the recipe for this day/week. I aborted my pizza plan, picked out my thyme mushrooms and admittedly, ate some of the less watery mozzarella bites, and decided on the spaghetti dinner mentioned the book--only made with zucchini noodles, pesto and the thyme mushrooms. A healthier choice anyway--although someday I will try that crustless pizza again. ;-)


Zucchini Spaghetti with Pesto & Thyme Mushrooms
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Serves 2)

2 large zucchini, ends trimmed
2 Tbsp olive oil
a pinch of sea salt
pesto of choice, store-bought or homemade (I used this leftover basil pistou)
Thyme Mushrooms (recipe below)

Use a spiralizer, julienne peeler or regular vegetable peeler to slice or shave zucchini into noodles. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat, add oil and zucchini noodles, tossing to distribute the oil. Cook until noodles are slightly softened, about 2 minutes.

Remove from the heat, stir in the pesto--tossing until the zucchini noodles are well-coated. Fold in the thyme mushrooms and serve.

-----

Thyme Mushrooms
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Serves 2)

1 Tbsp olive oil
1 garlic clove, minced
8 oz fresh mushrooms (button or crimini), sliced
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves (or 1 1/2 tsp dried thyme)
sea salt and black pepper to taste

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and mushrooms and sauté until the mushrooms have browned--about 5 to 6 minutes. Stir in thyme and cook for another minute or so. Season to taste with salt and pepper.


Notes/Results: Very simple but very tasty with lots of flavor from the pesto and the thyme mushrooms. Although it was my second choice as a dish, it made a quick, easy and satisfying dinner for a grumpy person on a humid night. If you don't have a spiralizer, you can use a peeler for wider thin noodles, or stack and slice them for a more spaghetti-like experience. The mushrooms are tasty on their own as a side dish too. I used a lighter hand with the pesto--about 2 tablespoons as I didn't want it to overpower the mushrooms and it all worked well together. I would happily make it again.


I'm sharing this post with the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "The Last Thing I Told You" was provided to me by the author and the publisher, Harper Collins, via TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.

You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.
 

 

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Zucchini Noodles and Salmon in a Curry-Coconut Soup for Souper (Soup, Salad, & Sammie) Sundays

I have been doing my best to cut the bread and the wheat and all that kind ofstuff for the past couple of weeks and load up on the vegetables and fish and meat-free protein sources instead. I'll confess to craving noodles in a big way, and since I had a supply of zucchini in the fridge I decided to spiralize them and put them in a curry noodle bowl along with coconut milk and salmon. We've still had hot and humid weather but I find brothy noodle bowls and curry, things I crave regardless of the temperature.



The broth is a spin on the coconut curry broth from Chloe Coscarelli's Vegan Ramen Bowl that I made a few months ago, only a few more ingredients added. You could of course use any kind of noodle, vegetable and protein in the bowl.


Curry Soup with Zucchini Noodles and Salmon
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Makes about 4 Servings)

1 Tbsp coconut oil, or oil of choice
2 shallots. Thinly sliced
4 or 5 scallions, chopped, white & green parts separated
1 red bell pepper, seeded & cut into 1 1/2-inch strips
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 1/2-inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled & grated
2 Tbsp curry powder of choice, or to taste
½ tsp turmeric
4 to 5 kaffir lime leaves, torn
4 cups good, low-sodium vegetable broth
2 cans coconut milk, light or regular (I used one of each)
1 lb wild salmon fillets, raw, skinned and chopped into 2-inch pieces
1 1/2 Tbsp fish sauce or tamari or soy sauce
1 Tbsp fresh lime juice, or to taste
zucchini noodles from 3 large zucchini, cut to desired thickness, or noodles of choice
chili paste or hot sauce as desired
cilantro leaves and lime wedges to garnish

In a large soup pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the shallots, the whites of the scallions and the  red bell pepper and sauté about 5minutes until veggies start to soften and shallots start to turn opaque. Add the garlic and ginger and sauté another 2 minutes, then stir in the curry powder, turmeric, and kaffir lime leaves and cook another minute until spices are fragrant.

Add the vegetable broth and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in coconut milk and bring back up to a soft boil. Add salmon pieces and cook about 5 minutes until salmon is just cooked through. Try not to stir so as not to break up salmon. Add fish sauce and lime juice and taste and season as needed.

To serve, divide zucchini noodles into large soup bowls. Ladle the soup mixture on top and garnish with the green part of the scallions and fresh cilantro leaves. Serve with wedges of fresh lime and hot sauce or chili paste.
Enjoy!
 

Notes/Results: This hit the spot—a big bowl of soupy curry zoodles that was just as enjoyable as pasta or rice noodles. You can change out the veggies to whatever you like or have on hand. I would have added spinach or bok choy but I forgot to buy any.   I like zucchini noodles but spiralized carrots or sweet potato would be good too. For those, or if you want more tender zucchini noodles, add them to the soup pot after you add the salmon so they soften. You can also use whatever protein you’d like; tofu, cooked chicken, another fish, whatever you like.  I didn’t make this soup particularly spicy—my curry is a medium spice on it’s own so either add Thai chiles or a jalapeno to your veggies, or add your favorite hot sauce or chili paste to the soup when you add the fish sauce and life juice. The zoodles help keep this one light but satisfying and perfect for a warm, humid day. I will happily make it again.


Let's look into the Souper Sundays kitchen and see who is here.


Debra of Eliot's Eats brought Tortellini Salad with Tomatoes and Olives inspired by a recent read and said, "Truly, is there any food that speaks “family” more than pasta? Even if the the family is dysfunctional and flawed (as every family truly is to some degree)? ... This is an easy hearty salad, fully of summer bounty and goodness. ... Because of the briny olives, I did not add any salt to my salad.  Just beware and salt cautiously."



Judee of Gluten Free A-Z Blog shared her Spinach Dal in the Instant Pot or Not and said, "Spinach Dal which is known in India as Palak Dal is a hearty soup made with yellow split peas, tomatoes, spices, and spinach. ... I simply sauteed onions, tomatoes, garlic and spices for 5 minutes right in the IP ( Instant Pot) and then added my yellow split peas. I switched to manual setting and set the cook setting for 15 minutes! (which of course means it will take about 10 minutes to heat up before it begins cooking) You can do the same on the stove top- just add more liquid and allow to cook for about an hour  ( or more) until lentils are soft. I add the freshly chopped spinach after the soup was cooked and watched the greens melt right into the pot! So Good!"


 
And Tina of Squirrel Head Manor enjoyed a healthy Greek Salad with Chicken and said, "Salads, cold fruit and cool meals are in order these days. For a healthy change I had a Greek Salad with grilled chicken.  Excellent lunch. I have not abandoned my new Chowderland book yet and still have another chowder to share, but with the hot weather I think I may give that particular book a rest. Basically this is just a Greek salad with grilled chicken on top. Satisfying and cool for hot summer days. Chowder and news about the new ride coming up soon."


Mahalo to everyone who joined in with Souper Sundays this week!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.) 

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:

  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Monday, May 29, 2017

Gingery Green Curry Miso Broth with Zucchini Noodles, Kitchen Tools Review & Giveway {#worksmarter #sharpenyourkitcheniq}

When my blogging friend, the amazing Camilla of Culinary Adventures with Camilla was gathering a few bloggers together to test kitchen tools from KitchenIQ and create a recipe using them, I quickly signed up--especially hearing that one, an all-in-one ginger tool, might help me with my ginger problem. Yes, I have a ginger problem. I love the flavor of ginger and using it in my recipes but I REALLY hate messing with it--peeling it, grating it, and trying to do it quickly and efficiently without losing all of the wonderful ginger juice that fresh ginger puts out. I will confess that I often resort to those frozen ginger cubes or ginger in a tube--just to save myself the hassle. I was also looking forward to testing the spice grater and the zester as I love cooking with spices and between citrus, cheese, and chocolate, I find myself zesting often.


  The three KitchenIQ products we would be testing were:


Note: KitchenIQ has supplied these three products to me for free (and a set to giveaway to one U.S. reader below) in return for a fair and honest product test and review so I'll give you my thoughts on each of them--how easy they were to use, how well they worked, and (important to me) how easier they were to clean, care for and put away.


    The V-etched Better Zester:

    I have a microplane zester that I was given by and friend and that I use pretty much constantly so I wasn't sure that I needed a new one but the V-etched Better Zester lives up to the name, it is actually better than my microplane for a few reasons. It has a comfortable handle that is easy to grip--which I like as my old zester is one long strip of teeth/blades. This zester also has 300 tiny teeth that really catch the peel well, without the pith (as long as you don't press too hard). My main love and something I didn't realize I loved so much is the storage container on the back of the zester that not ony collect and measures whatever you are zesting, it has a tiny "squeegee" that removes the moist zest from the citrus from the back of the blade, making clean up a snap and giving you dry, sprinkle worthy citrus zest. Love it! I also tested it with Parmigiano-Reggiano and bittersweet chocolate and it was equally handy for grating, measuring, and cleaning up afterward. Sorry old zester, you have been replaced! 



    The Grate Ginger Tool:

    As I mentioned, this was the tool I was most interested in trying and I was not disappointed. Everything you need to work with ginger is together in one hand-size tool. This one took its first test with the back-of-the-package instructions handy to review as I went through the different steps to peel, juice, grate and slice a piece of fresh ginger. Probably everyone knows the best way to peel ginger is with a spoon but the hard green plastic spoon that is attached is equally as effective in in removing the skin as a regular spoon. Juicing and grating sort of happen together and this was my favorite part about the tool--you simply grate your peeled ginger, remove the grater tray and use the grater cover to press the juice from the pulp--with no waste. You can then use the juice--or reserve it for other recipes and use the finely grated ginger. There is also the magic "squeegee" that runs along the underside of the blade as you pull it out and cleans the ginger from the grater making it easy to clean. I tried the slicer and it works pretty well with the blade slicing fairly easily through the tough ginger root. I usually slice my ginger thicker than this blade does, but I don't see that as a problem for most recipes and it in fact might be better for some. Out of the three tools, this one has the most pieces and I realize I am going to have to be careful not to lose the clear blade cover and forget to put the spoon back in ;-) but it does clean and go back together pretty easily. I did not try it with the other aromatics it was recommend to be used for like garlic and daikon, but I am sure I will soon. Another win--I would buy this one for myself or as a gift.



    The V-etched Spice Grater:

    I have an electric spice grinder that I seldom use because I hate dragging it out of the cupboard, cleaning any leftover spices that I didn't clean well the last time and plugging it in, then repeating the whole process. So I either tend to use my spices whole--as in my chai tea blend or I resort to quickly grabbing my jarred powdered spices. This grater is easy and fast to grab, has tiny sharp teeth for hard spices, and makes quick work of cinnamon, nutmeg, and one of my favorite spices, star anise. There is a tray to catch the grated spices so you can easily measure them for your dishes. I saw on the package that you can grate nuts (walnuts and pecans are shown) and I am looking forward to trying that. The blade and tray are easily rinsed and wiped clean and it is a lot more convenient than dragging my grinder down on a regular basis for hard spices. Sometimes a bit of the spice I was grating flew loose, or I found that I lose a little more of the spice at the very end than I do with an electronic grinder, but the consistent fine powder I got and the ease of using it outweigh that in my opinion. A great tool for any spice-loving cook.

    Overall:

    I have a very small and too-full-of-stuff kitchen so as much as I love them, I try to limit my kitchen tools to those that I use regularly, have more than one purpose, and really work. All three of these KitchenIQ tools pass the taste and I will be using them all often--plus they are just fun to use and to look at with their bright colors and shapes. An honest thumbs up to all three of these tools from me.

    Be sure to check out the giveaway below for a chance to win your own set.


    Besides testing the tools, we were asked to come up with a recipe that allowed us to showcase the tools in action. I had several things in mind but in the end, it was a craving for a brothy and flavorful bowl of zucchini noodles that came to mind. I wanted something quick and easy but with a good mix of flavors and my own touch, so I enhanced prepared green curry paste and white miso with grated ginger and ginger juice from The Great Ginger Tool, added a kiss of star anise to add complexity with the V-etched Spice Grater, and finished it with lime juice and perfect zest from the V-etched Better Zester

    This is a light lunch dish that goes together quickly and is about the flavor of the broth so I kept to spiralized zucchini noodles but you could of course use any quick cooking noodle and add other veggies and/or tofu or another protein to bulk it up however you like. 

    Gingery Green Curry Miso Broth with Zucchini Noodles
    By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
    (Serves 2)

    1 Tbsp coconut oil (or olive oil)
    2 green onions, chopped
    1 Tbsp finely grated ginger
    2 Tbsp Thai Green Curry paste (I use Thai Kitchen brand)
    1 Tbsp ginger juice (optional)
    4 cups good veggie broth
    1 cup water
    1/2 tsp star anise
    2 medium zucchini, spiralized into a fettuccine noodle size, or rice noodles, or noodles of choice
    2 Tbsp white miso paste
    2 tbsp fresh lime juice
    1/2 Tbsp lime zest
    salt and pepper to taste
    fresh lime zest and sesame seeds to garnish

    Heat oil in a medium sauce pan and add green onions, grated ginger, and green curry paste. Cook until fragrant, about 2-3 minutes. Add ginger juice if using (I recommend), veggie broth, and water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer soup about 10 minutes to meld flavors.

    Add zucchini noodles and let cook for 3-4 minutes until just tender. Place the miso paste into a small bowl and ladle in a cup of the hot broth. Whisk thoroughly with a fork until miso paste is dissolved into the broth, then add broth back into the soup. Add lime juice and 1/2 Tbsp of the zest. Taste for seasoning and add additional lime juice and salt and pepper as desired.  

    Divide into two large bowls. Garnish with additional lime zest and sesame seeds. Enjoy!


    Notes/Results: This is a simple dish that really packs in the Asian-inspired flavors and totally hit the spot for my ginger, green curry, and miso cravings--why should I have to choose just one? The lime juice and zest keep it bright and the star anise is there--subtle in the background--but making you wonder why this broth is so darn good. I won't lie, I ate both servings myself because I didn't want to stop eating it. ;-) I will happily make this again using my fun new tools. 


    I'm linking up this tasty soup to Souper Sundays, hosted here at Kahakai Kitchen. Each Sunday we feature delicious soups, salads, and sandwiches from friends around the blogosphere--please join in if you have any to share. Here's this week's post and linkup  



    ***KitchenIQ Tools Giveaway!***
    Note: KitchenIQ is generously providing a Three-Tool Prize Package to one lucky U.S. resident (in the 48 contiguous states--sorry!) Winner will be chosen by Rafflecopter and notified here as well as email and have 48 hours to respond or the next winner will be chosen. We cannot be held responsible for items lost in the mail.

    To enter the Rafflecopter Giveaway below, leave a comment (Because I like to read them!) ;-) telling me about either your favorite kitchen tool to use or your worst kitchen chore to complete.

    There are a few other optional ways to get more entries to win: 1) Tweet about this giveaway or 2) follow me on Twitter (@DebinHawaii) and/or KitchenIQ (@KitchenIQ), 
    (Note: You can still get extra entries even if you already follow me or KitchenIQ on Twitter.)

    Deadline for entry is Tuesday, June 6th.


    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    Good Luck!