Showing posts with label seafood. Show all posts
Showing posts with label seafood. Show all posts

Sunday, April 28, 2019

Jacques Pépin's Seafood Chowder with Salmon & Shrimp for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

I wanted a simple chowder this week as I was craving fish and seafood. I found one in Jacques Pépin's Seafood Chowder from More Fast Food My Way. I like the mushroom and zucchini and also was interested in the mashed potato flakes as a thickener. 


I made a few changes--subbing in coconut milk for the half-and-half and adding frozen corn for the sweetness, and leaving my shrimp whole. I also added some smoked paprika at the end. 

Seafood Chowder
Slightly Adapted from More Fast Food My Way by Jacques Pépin 
(Serves 4)

2 Tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 cups trimmed, split, washed & sliced leeks
1 Tbsp coarsely chopped garlic
2 1/2 cups bottled clam juice
1 1/2 cups water
1 cup coarsely chopped white mushrooms
3/4 tsp salt
1 1/2 cups diced (about 1/2-inch) zucchini
1 cup instant mashed potato flakes
3/4 cup (1-inch) pieces peeled uncooked shrimp
1 cup (1-inch) pieces boneless fish fillet
2/3 cup half-and-half (I used coconut milk)  

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over high heat. When hot, add the leek and garlic and saute for about 1 minute . Add the clam juice, water. mushroom, and salt, bring to a boil, and boil for about 2 minutes. Stir in the zucchini and sprinkle the potato flakes on top, mixing them in with a whisk to prevent lumping. Bring to a boil and boil for about 1 minute. (The soup can be prepared several hours ahead to this point.)

At serving time, bring the soup back to a boil, add the shrimp, fish, and half-and-half and bring back just to a boil. The fish and shrimp will be cooked through. Divide among four bowls and garnish with crab meat or chives, and smoked paprika if desired. Serve immediately. 


Notes/Results: A good solid chowder, with a thick and creamy broth and lots of texture from the ingredients. I did add some smoked paprika to the mix and also squeezed a little lemon on my bowl to give it more of a pop of flavor. I would keep the sweet corn and next time I might add a bit of thyme to the mix, or dill would be another good option. It's hearty without being heavy and pairs well with bread to mop up the broth--I used leftover marbled rye. For the speed and ease, I would make it again.


Linking up with I Heart Cooking Clubs where it is Potluck week--any recipe from any of our featured IHCC chefs.

The lovely Debra is hanging out with me in the Souper Sundays kitchen this week, let's take a look.


Debra of Eliot's Eats shared these Chef Grant's Best Burgers with Sauce Gribiche and Green Apple. She says, "These are great burgers for a weeknight meal. We enjoyed the combination of the creamy sauce gribiche with the slight crunch of the fried apple and the bacon-burger. (And, I am so stealing the onion and caraway mix for future recipes.)

 
Thanks to Debra for joining in!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

 
To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).
You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter

Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Friday, April 12, 2019

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "The Library of Lost and Found" by Phaedra Patrick, Served with Recipes for Fish and Chips with Mushy Peas & Dill Mayo

Happy Friday! I love books and I especially love books about books, so i am very excited to be today's stop on the TLC Book Tour for The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick. Accompanying my review is a very Friday appropriate (and classic British-leaning) dish of Fish and Chips with Mushy Peas and Dill Mayo.


Publisher's Blurb:

A librarian’s discovery of a mysterious book sparks the journey of a lifetime in the delightful new novel from the international bestselling author of The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper

Librarian Martha Storm has always found it easier to connect with books than people—though not for lack of trying. She keeps careful lists of how to help others in her superhero-themed notebook. And yet, sometimes it feels like she’s invisible.

All of that changes when a book of fairy tales arrives on her doorstep. Inside, Martha finds a dedication written to her by her best friend—her grandmother Zelda—who died under mysterious circumstances years earlier. When Martha discovers a clue within the book that her grandmother may still be alive, she becomes determined to discover the truth. As she delves deeper into Zelda’s past, she unwittingly reveals a family secret that will change her life forever.

Filled with Phaedra Patrick’s signature charm and vivid characters, The Library of Lost and Found is a heartwarming and poignant tale of how one woman must take control of her destiny to write her own happy ending.

Hardcover: 352 Pages

Publisher: Park Row; Original edition (March 26, 2019)

My Review: 

I have had the author's first book, The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper, on my TBR list for age,s so it was more the premise of this story about a mysterious little book of fairy tales coming into an isolated librarian's life that caused me to jump on this tour.

Martha Storm hasn't had an easy life and now in her forties, rightly feels like much of it has passed her by, caring for her aging parents until their passings and being quite a doormat, almost compulsively helping her neighbors, townspeople and library patrons with their tasks and lives. but not getting anything other than more requests in return. Martha was an outsider in her family from a young age, with a controlling father who markedly preferred her younger sister, and a mother who acquiesced to her father's rules and demands. Her eccentric and vibrant 'nana' and the sharing of books and writing stories are the bright spots in Martha's life until she disappears and her parents tell her Zelda has passed away. It's a tiny battered book of the fairy tales she and Zelda told each other and it was published after Zelda's death. The book sets Martha on a journey to learn Zelda's secrets and discover what happened all the those years ago and it's a journey that teaches her about herself. 

Watching Martha change and grow and begin to find her spark and stop living for others was my favorite part of the book. The fairy tales mixed into the story are wonderful too, although bordering on the melancholy at times, they illustrate what Martha, her mother, and her nana were going through. The Library of Lost and Found is an endearing novel with engaging characters that has its harder, sadder moments, but doesn't dwell long in them. It is a an easy, pleasing read and a feel-good story about books and writing, family and secrets, and ultimately the power of finding yourself and your passions. 

-----

Author Notes: Phaedra Patrick studied art and marketing and has worked as a stained glass artist, film festival organizer and communications manager. She is a prize winning short story writer and now writes full time.

She lives in the UK with her husband and son. The Curious Charms of Arthur Pepper is her debut novel.


Connect with Phaedra on her website, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

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Food Inspiration:

There was food and drink to be found The Library of Lost and Found, and plenty of traditional British food. Mentions included heart-shaped cookies, rosé wine, bacon,Cheese and onion pie, tea and biscuits, chocolate fudge cake, ice cream sundaes, cordial, ham sandwiches, beef and potatoes, steak and kidney pie, coffee and cake, beans on toast, hot dogs, candy floss, ice cream with chocolate flakes and multicolored sugar sprinkles, a toffee apple, muesli, milkshakes, Americanos, macchiatos, date and walnut cake, sticky toffee pudding, carrot cake, chips and cheese, pickled onions, pie and peas and pickled red cabbage, a dinner party that included blush prosecco, baby new potatoes in minted butter, steamy carrots and green beans, a juicy nut roast, and slices of beef, bread with salt and peppercorn butter, coleslaw, Chardonnay, fruit loaf with juicy cherries and sultanas, tiramisu and merlot, cheese sandwich and a cup of tea, cottage pie, salmon carrot sticks and hummus, sausage rolls and crisp, anniversary cake, a salad of lettuce, tomatoes and cucumber in a bowl with cress sprinkled on top, sausages and pineapple on sticks, apple pie, rhubarb crumble, chocolates, tomato soup with bred and butter and golden tea, milk and hot buttered toast, mince pies, and turkey with vegetables and gravy. 


For my book-inspired dish, I went with a British classic--fish and chips with mushy peas enjoyed on a cold day along the seaside. Martha's enjoyment of this meal with her family was palpable--trying to keep themselves and their takeout food warm and the mention of the pools of brown vinegar she loved. I love fish and chips although I am more a tarter sauce fan than vinegar. I found a Nigella Lawson recipe for mushy peas (Called Pea Puree on Food Network) and her recipe for Dill Mayonnaise and I used Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's Perfect Fish and Chips from RiverCottage.com. I will confess that my French Fries were grabbed through a drive-thru on my way home and crisped up in my toaster oven.
 

Nigella's Posh Mushy Peas aka Pea Puree
Slightly Adapted from Nigella Lawson via Food Network.com
(Yield 1 Serving)

1 clove garlic
5 oz frozen pies
1 to 2 Tbsp crème fraîche (I used sour cream)
1 to 2 Tbsp grated Parmesan or Pecorino
1/2 tsp dried mint
(I added about 1 Tbsp lemon juice)

Fill a pan with cold water and throw in the clove of garlic. Bring to the boil and then add salt and the peas. Cook until tender, drain, and put into a food processor, or blender, and add the crème fraîche, cheese, and dried mint. Puree the peas until knobbly and check the seasoning, adding salt if you need to. Tip the pureed peas into a bowl (or back in the pan is probably a better idea) and cover to keep them warm. 

-----

Dill Mayonnaise
Slightly Adapted from Nigella Lawson via Food Network.com 
(Makes 1 Cup)

1 cup good mayonnaise 
small bunch dill (about 1/3 cup
lemon or lime juice to taste
(I added 1 Tbsp capers, drained)

Put the mayonnaise into a bowl, and finely chop the dill, adding it to the mayonnaise. Stir in capers and some lime juice and taste for seasoning. Serve with the prepared fish.

-----

Perfect Fish and Chips
Slightly Adapted from RiverCottage.com
(Serves 3)


300ml (about 10 oz) beer
200g (about 1 cup) flour

salt (I added black pepper)
2 fresh fillets of pollock (I used cod)
500ml (about 2 cups) sunflower oil


Salt the fish fillets. Add 200g of plain flour with seasoning of salt to a large bowl. Add beer slowly and whisk flour with enough beer to turn into double cream consistency with no lumps.

Dip fish in and then into the oil at 160°C (320 F.) for 2-3 minutes until crispy and golden, drain and put on kitchen towel briefly before serving.


Notes/Results: Although I like peas, I wasn't sure I got the whole mushy peas appeal with fish and chips, but these peas are tasty and especially if you use vinegar with your fish and chips, the slight sweetness of the peas is a nice contrast. I liked the prominent dill flavor in the mayo sauce, but I of course needed to add my beloved capers too. The fish (I used frozen cod) was perfectly cooked--moist and tender and the beer batter appropriately crisp. Had i had more time to get dinner made, homemade fries would have been the best, but these take-outdid fine in a pinch. Although not a very healthy meal, it was well worth the indulgence and I would happily make it all again.


Linking up with I Heart Cooking Clubs where it this week we have a Cuisine Spotlight on Classic British Food.

I'm sharing this post with the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "The Library of Lost and Found" was provided to me by the author and the publisher via TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.  
 
You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.


 

Sunday, March 31, 2019

Chinese Egg Drop Soup with Shrimp for Cook the Books Club: February/March Pick: "Crazy Rich Asians"

So this wasn't the recipe I intended to cook for this round of Cook the Books, our virtual foodie book club, but I got behind in my reading, life and work got in my way and then I caught what I think is a doozy of a cold or sinus infection and have been laid up all weekend. So I decided that my Singapore Street Noodle ingredients, were going to morph into a soup, but curry and noodles just didn't sound good this morning. What did? A simple and restorative Chinese Egg Drop Soup with Shrimp


I had been meaning to read Crazy Rich Asians so I was pleased when my fellow Hawaii co-host Claudia of Honey From Rock selected it. (See her announcement here.) I saw the movie before the book (but missed the tie-in with Food & Flix) and wanted to see if I enjoyed the book as much. I did enjoy it, but the fun and vibrant film won me over more. the movie streamlined the many family members and plot lines and was easier to digest and you could see all of the food and clothes and wealthy excess rather than read about it. On the other hand, the film does cut a lot out and I appreciated Kevin Kwan's detailed footnotes about the slang, descriptions of the dishes, etc. Although I didn't hang out in most of the elite places he mentions, he does bring the city to life and brought me back to the times I spent there. The time spent on the settings at times overshadows the character development. I wanted a more complete ending in the book too, but since it's a trilogy, I guess I will need to read the other two books to get more detail on what happens next with Rachel and Nick.


There was so much good food in Crazy Rich Asians--it definitely sent me back to my days of traveling there for work and eating at the hawker stalls and great little cafes and coffee shops there. As mentioned, my dish is not Singaporean, but nothing says comfort like egg drop soup and I have a feeling that Rachel's mom might have made her a bowl or two when she needed it.


For my recipe, I looked on line but ultimately just kept the bones of most of the recipes I tried and just threw together what I wanted. That is the beauty of this soup--good broth, eggs and whatever you have on hand--like shrimp and peas that were going into my noodles. Easy and low effort and much better and less salty than the kind from your local Chinese restaurant.

Chinese Egg Drop Soup
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Serves 4)

4 green onions, sliced, white and green parts separated
1-inch piece of ginger, peeled
5 cups chicken stock or broth (I used no-chicken bouillon paste)
4 tsp cornstarch
sea salt and black pepper to taste
about 1 cup frozen green peas, thawed 
8 oz medium shrimp, shelled and de-veined
5 eggs
toasted sesame oil and/or chili oil, if desired

Combine the onions, ginger and stock and bring to a boil in a large soup pan over a high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer about 10 minutes. 

Make a slurry with the cornstarch, salt, pepper and 2 Tbsp water in a small bowl, whisking well until the cornstarch is dissolved. Stir the slurry into the soup, stirring with a slotted spoon. Add peas and shrimp to the soup and cook about 2 minutes. 

Beat eggs together well in a small bowl. Using a fork across the lips of the bowl, slowly pour egg through. Let the eggs set for a few minutes, then break them apart into the desired size pieces--you can use a fork or chopstick to break apart the eggs. 

Ladle into bowls and top with the sliced green onions and a drizzle of toasted sesame oil and/or chili oil if desired.


Notes/Results: This soup hit the spot today as my head and sinuses are pounding and I needed something simple and soothing. It is velvety and rich and I liked the sweeter bites of shrimp and peas, mixed in the savory broth. I tend to order egg drop soup in Chinese restaurants as it reminds me of family dinners at a very Americanized Chinese restaurant in Portland that my mom and dad loved. I forget how easy it is to make this fridge/pantry soup at home and I will definitely make it again.


The deadline for this round of CTB is tody, March 31st and Claudia be rounding up the entries on the Cook the Books site soon after. If you missed this round and like food, books, and foodie books, join us for February/March when we'll be reading Buttermilk Graffiti, hosted by Debra of Eliot's Eats. 


Since we are on a soup kick and this was our last week cooking with Ruth Reichl at I Heart Cooking Clubs, and I didn't get a chance to make a dish to say Goodbye Ruth with, here are five great soups I cooked with her:

 
First, so good I made it twice, her Avgolemono Soup

 
Classic Congee:

 
The retro Cream of Watercress Soup

 
Another retro find, Eggplant Soup Parmigiana


And finally, her Hot Vegetarian (Vegan) Vichyssoise:
 

It was a delicious six months! I look forward to cooking more with Ruth and all of our past featured chefs at IHCC when we celebrate our Ten-Year: All Chefs Edition. Hope you join in the fun! 
 
  
And, last but not least, we have one guest in the Souper Sunday kitchen this week, let's see what she brought...

Angela of Mean Green Chef shares Robust Cabbage Soup and says, "Healthy Robust Cabbage Soup, a full-flavored bowl that’s healthy and light. Super easy to prepare and totally versatile you can add more veg or even some roasted chicken if you want to! You’ve probably seen a lot of cabbage soup recipes for weight loss due to the fact its low calorie. Which is a great benefit, but we also love the full-on taste from sauteing which really helps to develop a serious punch of flavor!"


Thanks for joining in, Angela!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

 
To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Sunday, February 3, 2019

A Souper Bowl of Shrimp in Coconut Milk with Rice for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

It doesn't get cold enough here to give me cabin fever, but we have had a very rainy and blustery week, that has me limiting my outside time. A sure cure for the inside blahs is a bowl of soup with a tropical vibe, like this recipe for Shrimp and Coconut Milk from The Gourmet Cookbook (checked out of the library to give me some more Ruth Reichl recipes)


This is meant to be more of a soupy dish than an actual soup, but I added extra coconut milk and broth and left out the flour. It soups up quite nicely and since it's Super Bowl Sunday, I'd call it a Souper Bowl of tasty soup. My changes to the recipe are noted in red below.


Shrimp in Coconut Milk with Rice 
Slightly Adapted from The Gourmet Cookbook, Edited by Ruth Reichl 
(Serves 4 to 6)

1 1/2 lbs large shrimp in shells (21-25 per pound) (I used 16-20 per lb)
4 cups water
1/2 tsp salt
2 Tbsp fresh lime juice (I added extra to soup)
3 Tbsp vegetable oil (I used 2 Tbsp olive oil)
2 garlic cloves
1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, & thinly spiced
2 medium onions, thinly sliced (I used one large sweet onion)
3 Tbsp all-purpose flour (I omitted)
2 (14-16 oz) cans whole tomatoes in juice, drained, seeded & chopped
(I added 2 cups good light vegetable stock)
2 cups well-stirred unsweetened coconut milk (from two 14 oz cans) (I added both cans)
freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup sliced scallions greens (from 2 large scallions)
1/2 cups coarsely chopped fresh cilantro sprigs
Cooked rice to serve

Combine shrimp shells, water, and salt in a 3-quart saucepan, bring to a simmer, and simmer until reduced to about 2 cups, 15 to 20 minutes. Pour shrimp broth through a sieve into a large glass measuring cup; discard shells.

Meanwhile, combine shrimp, lime juice, and salt to taste in a bowl and refrigerate, covered.

Heat oil in a 4-quart heavy saucepan over moderate heat. Add garlic, bell pepper, and onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add flour and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in tomatoes, coconut milk, and shrimp broth and simmer, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are soft, 15 to 20 minutes.

Drain shrimp, add to saucepan and simmer, stirring occasionally, until just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper and sprinkle with scallions and cilantro. (I added extra lime juice to taste.) Serve with rice.


Notes/Results: Simple, rich and great flavor from the shrimp stock (although the non-chicken veggie stock and extra lime juice I added helped too). The rice is a must to soak up the creamy coconut milk broth and the the cilantro and green onion add color and flavor. The soup has a couple of extra steps--making the shrimp stock (keep this step for the flavor) and using whole tomatoes, but chopping, de-seeding and draining them (I think you could easily use good diced tomatoes and skip this step with no ill effects). It's cool but sunny today (finally) and this soup made a great Souper Bowl Sunday lunch. I would happily make it again.


Linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where this week's theme is Cabin Fever--Ruth Reichl recipes to soothe your spirit when you have been cooped up in the cold weather.  

 
Now let's look into the Souper Sundays kitchen and see who is here:


Debra of Eliot's Eats shared two recipes this week. First is her soupy Instant Pot Anasazi Beans. She says, "I had a surplus of Anasazi beans in the pantry and I used some of the roasted green chiles that I have in the freezer along with some long-ago-forgotten frozen ham. Everything else came from the pantry so this was an easy meal. ... These Anasazi beans came from the Taos farmer’s market. It’s a good thing that dried beans virtually last forever because it has been some time since we traveled to New Mexico. The provenance of the beans is what prompted me to throw in the Hatch green chiles."

  
Her next dish is this tasty looking Kula Pickled Beet Salad for our recent Cook the Books book club selection. She said, "I was lazy and shredded my daikon and carrots and just made “sticks” out of the cucumber. Because I had a surplus of jarred pickled beets (more about that later), I just used a premade pickled beet for this recipe. That being said, I do want to try the ginger and lemongrass recipe the next time I harvest beets. I was a little skeptical about the pureed kale. I have to say that the smear of kale made this salad!"


QuiltLady of Chasing My Life is here with a Deconstructed Pork Egg Roll Salad that takes a classic Asian-style appetizer and puts it into salad form. Ponzu sauce and crispy wontons top it off.

Tina of Squirrel Head Manor shared Grilled Potato Salad and said, "I try some copycat recipes sometimes and this one is inspired from Zoe's Kitchen. Potato salad can make a nice side dish but I don't like the ones that have too much mayonnaise. I saw this grilled version on the menu and thought I had to try it. Looking and tasting the version I was served at Zoe's resulted in a fairly good version, but not an identical knockoff."


Judee of Gluten Free A-Z Blog brought Moroccan Chickpea and Olive Salad and said, "Chickpea and olive salad is easy to make and absolutely delicious. Moroccan recipes often include a fair amount of olives, and this dish is no exception. This wonderful vegan salad can be made with green and or black olives, chickpeas, and cured lemon with lots of healthy herbs and spices."


Mahalo to everyone who joined in this week! 
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...


To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!