Showing posts with label olive oil. Show all posts
Showing posts with label olive oil. Show all posts

Sunday, May 19, 2019

Garlicky White Bean (Chickpea) Soup: 5 Ingredients or Less for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

I had been craving a simple bean-based soup and our theme this week at I Heart Cooking Clubs: All Chef's Edition is 5 Ingredients or Less. Of course I turned to Mark Bittman and found his Garlicky White Bean Soup.


Beans of choice, a bulb of garlic, rosemary, plus salt and pepper (not counted in our 5 or less) and olive oil for garnishing and that's it. Because I wanted chickpeas (even though I made a chickpea soup a few weeks ago, they are my favorite), the cooking time is longer than other white beans, even after soaking, but it's worth it and the wait while the rosemary-garlic aroma permeates the house.

Bittman's advice: "Use dried beans, don't skimp on the garlic (when I say '1 bulb' I mean it) and you won't be disappointed."


Garlicky White Bean Soup
Slightly Adapted from How To Cook Everything: The Basics via MarkBittman.com
(Serves 4)

1 1/2 cups any dried white beans, rinsed and picked over
1 medium garlic bulb, cloves peeled
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary leaves or 1 tsp dried
salt and freshly ground black pepper
olive oil for garnish

Deb's Note: I usually soak my beans--especially chickpeas--overnight before cooking.

In a large soup pot, place beans, garlic, and rosemary and add 6 cups of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then lower heat so the soup bubbles steadily. 

Cook, stirring every 20 minutes or so, until the beans are tender and falling apart, 45 minutes to up to 2 hours (or more) depending on the bean and whether they were soaked first. Add more water or broth if mixture gets too thick or dry. 

When beans are tender, sprinkle with salt and black pepper to taste and stir vigorously to break up the beans even more, or you can mash or puree some of the soup to thicken the broth even more. Taste and adjust salt and pepper if needed. Serve with a drizzle of olive oil on each bowl. Enjoy! 

Bittman has two variations--adding chopped greens or peeled shrimp during the last 5 minutes of cooking.  


Notes/Results: Perfectly garlicky, perfectly good. It's amazing what just a few good ingredients and lots of time will do. I ended up cooking the soup about 3 hours total to get the chickpeas as tender as I wanted them, which allowed them to build plenty of flavor from the garlic and rosemary and concentrating the broth. I pureed a couple of cups of the mixture to thicken it, and it was just the right texture. Simple and delicious, I would happily make it again.


Linking Up with I Heart Cooking Clubs: 5 Ingredients or Less.

 
 Let's take a look in the in the Souper Sundays kitchen.


Tina of Squirrel Head Manor brought Indian Cucumber and Tomato Salad and said, "The theme for May's spotlight dish at I Heart Cooking Clubs is Indian cuisine. My first thought was Tandoori chicken or a curry dish but I went with a simple salad. Diana Henry's recipe and column is posted at The Telegraph so I grabbed it there. She says this looks like an ordinary salad but it's fresh and punchy. Must be the chilli and cumin. Certainly smells good when you are heating the cumin."


Debra of Eliot's Eats shared Japanese Steakhouse Ginger Dressing with Salad and said, "My sister and mom had to make a quick trip back recently. They spent one day with us and Sis was telling me about a new salad dressing she had recently made. Her favorite cookbook is Joy of Cooking and she gave me a copy for Christmas many years ago. As she described the ingredients, I decided I had to look up this recipe in my own Joy of Cooking. It’s now bookmarked! The accompanying salad was made of spinach, shredded carrots, chopped celery, cucumbers, radishes and bean sprouts. I had also intended to toss in some snow peas but I forgot. This is a great salad and an even better dressing.   It is definitely a way to get your family to eat their vegetables!"

 
Thanks to Debra and Tina for joining in this week!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...
 

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).
You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter

Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Sunday, March 17, 2019

Diana Henry's Ribollita & Six Favorite Cabbage Recipes for Souper (Soup, Salad, & Sammie) Sundays

Happy St. Patrick's Day! Since I don't eat meat, corned beef isn't making an appearance on my table today, but I am working in a couple of classic ingredients; cabbage and potatoes. I've chosen to give them an Italian spin with a cozy bowl of Diana Henry's Ribollita. Ribollita means twice-cooked or reboiled and it is a classic peasant soup from Tuscany that is a good use of leftover bread for a thick and hearty soup.


Diana Henry says, "I never liked the idea of ribollita--it is, after all, cabbage soup, and I've spent too much of my life on the cabbage soup diet--but this is a wonderful, rich, multi-dimensional dish. I learned how to make it (and how important the stock and olive oil are to the final flavour) on a cooking course in Florence. Don't rush it; make it with care and good ingredients and you will be rewarded. Made well, this is one of the world's great soups."


Ribollita
Slightly Adapted from Plenty by Diana Henry
(Serves 4)

8 oz Savoy cabbage or kale
2 Tbsp butter
1 leek, trimmed and chopped
1 celery stalk, finely chopped
1 large carrot, diced
4 oz (1/3 lb) waxy potatoes, diced
4 cups chicken or beef stock
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to serve
2 rosemary sprigs
3 garlic cloves
6 slices coarse white country bread
3/4 cup cooked cannellini beans
2 large plum tomatoes

Cut the coarse central core from the cabbage, and slice the leaves. Melt the butter in a large, heavy pan and sauté the leeks and celery until pale gold, about 5 minutes. Add the carrots, cabbage or kale, and potatoes and cook for another 12 minutes, turning the vegetables over in the butter every so often. Add the stock, bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 45 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat the olive oil in a pan with the rosemary and 2 of the garlic cloves (leave them whole and unpeeled). When the oil starts to shimmer and the ingredients turn light brown, remove from the heat and leave to infuse.

Toast the bread and rub each piece with the remaining garlic clove (peeled, this time). Add the beans to the soup and cook for another 10 minutes.

Drop the tomatoes into a pot of boiling water and leave for 10 seconds. Lift them out and rinse in cold water, then slip off the skins. Halve the tomatoes, scoop out the seeds (discard them), and cube the flesh. Add the tomatoes and flavored oil to the soup and taste for seasoning.

In another large saucepan, layer the soup with the bread (break it up to help spread it out) and leave to cool. Put the soup in the refrigerator overnight. The next day, bring it to room temperature, then bring to a boil again. Serve, drizzled lavishly with more extra-virgin olive oil.


Notes/Results: For a humble peasant soup, there are quite a few different steps to making it between the rosemary-garlic oil, the garlic-rubbed toast, the peeled and chopped tomatoes, then layering the soup and bread, letting it cool, and letting it sit in the fridge overnight before reboiling it, but none of it is difficult to do and the result is well-worth it. The flavor of this simple soup really shines and it is thick and satisfying--the perfect comfort food. I forgot to drizzle the olive oil on the top before my photos, but I did take the extra step of chopping the rosemary leaves and garlic cloves that I steeped in the oil and used them as garnish. I used vegan butter and good vegan non-chicken bullion and for a vegan version. I would happily make it again.


Linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where it is our Monthly Featured Dish/Ingredient Challenge: Cabbage


Below are six more of my favorite dishes featuring cabbage from out IHCC chefs.

My absolute favorite cabbage recipe is also from Diana Henry, her Cabbage and Leek Colcannon. So buttery, so delicious!


Cabbage was meant for fish tacos and Curtis Stone's Grilled Mahi Mahi Tacos with Pico de Gallo are a great version.


Simple, flavorful and colorful, Jacques Pépin's Curried Coleslaw is perfect with fish.


Cabbage plays a supporting role in another tasty Diana Henry dish, Freekeh with Greens, Fennel, and Chile.


Ina's Cabbage Cucumber Slaw is wonderful with her Roasted Salmon Tacos.


Nigel Slater's Goat Cheese Bubble & Squeak is fun side dish that features cabbage.
   

And we have several good friends here for Souper Sundays, let's take a look...


Shaheen of Allotment2Kitchen is here with Purple Sprouting Broccoli and Sweet Potato Salad (with Vegan Black Pudding) and said, "To make this warm salad more of a substantial dish, I finished it off with some sliced of vegetarian black pudding, but that is optional. This certainly made a welcome change from our boring lettuce, cucumber and tomato salad."


Debra of Eliot's Eats shared Red Cabbage Keilbasa and Cannellini Bean Soup and said, "One of the first contests I entered this year was one sponsored by Aunt Nellie’s. I won third place honors, a $25 gift card and a gift package of Aunt Nellie’s products (most beet related). In the package was a jar of sweet and sour red cabbage. I had no idea what to do with it. Aunt Nellie’s website came through and I decided to make this soup based on a recipe found there. I added some wine (of course), decreased the amount of cabbage, and added hot paprika to my version."

 
Tina of Squirrel Head Manor made White Bean, Corn and Smoked Sausage Soup and said, "This one could also be named clean-out-the-fridge-soup, but white beans and sausage would be more appealing on a menu.  I'm glad I am keeping track of recipes on this blog because often enough I need to search it when I am grocery shopping.  Hoping Blogspot doesn't just go away because I'd be unhappy to lose all the recipes I have posted over the last 10 years."

Beth Fish Reads is trying out the Skinnytaste One & Done Cookbook and one of the recipes she made and enjoyed was the Chicken Tortilla Soup. She says, "I made a chicken soup (recipe below) in the pressure cooker, which had just the right level of heat. The curry-flavored roasted vegetables, a sheet pan dinner (shown at the right), was delicious as is but would also be good over rice or couscous. Note that I didn't make the green chutney but used my own homemade fruit chutney instead."

Thanks to everyone who joined in this week!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

 
To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).



 Have a happy, healthy week & Happy St. Patrick's Day!
 

Thursday, February 28, 2019

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "The Woman in the Lake" by Nicola Cornick, Served with an Avocado Caprese Salad

Happy Thursday and the last day of February. It's hard to believe that tomorrow, March begins. Easing my way into the month, I am happy to be a stop on the TLC Book Tour for The Woman in the Lake by Nicola Cornick. Accompanying today's book review is a tasty Avocado Caprese Salad, inspired by the book.


Publisher's Blurb:

London, 1765

Lady Isabella Gerard, a respectable member of Georgian society, orders her maid to take her new golden gown and destroy it, its shimmering beauty tainted by the actions of her brutal husband the night before.
 
Three months later, Lord Gerard stands at the shoreline of the lake, looking down at a woman wearing the golden gown. As the body slowly rolls over to reveal her face, it’s clear this was not his intended victim…
 
250 Years Later…

When a gown she stole from a historic home as a child is mysteriously returned to Fenella Brightwell, it begins to possess her in exactly the same way that it did as a girl. Soon the fragile new life Fen has created for herself away from her abusive ex-husband is threatened at its foundations by the gown’s power over her until she can’t tell what is real and what is imaginary.
 
As Fen uncovers more about the gown and Isabella’s story, she begins to see the parallels with her own life. When each piece of history is revealed, the gown—and its past—seems to possess her more and more, culminating in a dramatic revelation set to destroy her sanity.

Paperback: 320 Pages
Publisher: Graydon House; Original edition (March 1, 2019)

My Review:

This is my first novel from Nicola Cornick and I enjoyed it. I am a fan of dual stories and time periods and the the intriguing story of the malevolent yellow gown, that seems to bring out the worst in people--whether in 1765 or 2015. The Gothic feel and supernatural-horror vibe were a great combination with the historical aspects. I did feel like I wanted a deeper dive into some of the history with the house, the smuggler, the dress, etc. In  having the two eras with three different perspectives--Lady Isabella and her maid Constance in the past, and Fenella in the present, it's hard to get all of the detail in 320 pages. I did like the pacing and the twists and turns the story took. Cornick does a good job of vivid descriptions and setting a creepy tone that made for a few shivers on the windy and rainy evenings we have been having. I like that Lady Isabella was inspired by a real-life Lady Diana Spencer, an artist born in 1734, and that she had me Googling to learn more about her. If you like British history, mystery, supernatural elements and a quick, atmospheric and ultimately satisfying read, give The Woman in the Lake a try.
 
-----

Author Notes: USA Today bestselling author Nicola Cornick has written over 40 historical romances and now writes Gothic time slip for HQ and Graydon House.
Nicola’s writing is inspired by her love of history and was fostered by a wonderful history teacher and by her grandmother, whose collection of historical romantic fiction fed Nicola’s addiction from an early age. She studied in London and Oxford and works as a guide and historian in a 17th century house as well as acting as a historical adviser for TV and radio. Publisher’s Weekly have described her as a rising star and her books have been nominated for the Romantic Times Reviewers’ Choice Award and for the Romance Writers of America RITA Awards.

Nicola lives near Oxford with her husband and dog. When she isn’t writing she enjoys long walks in the countryside, singing in a choir and volunteering as a puppy walker for Guide Dogs. 

You can connect with her on her website, Facebook, and Twitter.

-----

 Food Inspiration:

Although not a prominent part of either time period, there was food and drink mentioned throughout the book that included sweet sherry, a spaniel named "Scampi" (made me think of shrimp scampi), canned baked beans, shepherd's pie, tea and toast, champagne, crepes and croissants, bread, cheese, chicken pie, apples and pears, biscuits, coffee (including a flat white), lemonade, BLT and cream cheese and smoked salmon sandwiches, orange juice, rosé wine, brandy, hot chocolate, apple juice, French onion soup, guacamole, sour cream dip and cucumber sandwiches, and marmalade and a breakfast roll.


I ended up taking my recipe inspiration from a salad Fen made before meeting work friends for drinks, early in the story, before she opens the package from her sister containing the golden gown. I love a good caprese salad of mozzarella, tomato and basil and like to add an avocado sometimes too. It also sounded like a perfect weeknight dinner and luckily good cherry and grape tomatoes and fresh basil are plentiful year-round here, so I didn't have to wait for summer.

"As she tossed some basil, mozzarella, sliced tomatoes and avocado into a bowl and sloshed in some olive oil, Fen caught sight of the parcel, still sitting on the table, waiting."


I don't know that you really need a recipe for this salad, but this is what I did. I will say that I am not a big balsamic fan so I tend to use my bottle of champagne vinegar or rice vinegar for salads like this. Use what you prefer, cut things the size you like--you really can't go wrong here.

Avocado Caprese Salad
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Serves 2 or more as a side)

1 pint cherry or grape tomatoes, halved
8 oz fresh mozzarella, cut into chunks
2 medium avocados cut into 3/4 chunks
1/3 cup fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp good quality extra-virgin olive oil
1 Tbsp champagne or rice vinegar
sea salt flakes and fresh ground black pepper to taste 

Gently toss tomatoes, mozzarella, avocado, basil, oil, and vinegar together in a bowl, Season to taste with flaked sea salt and black pepper. Divide into serving bowls and serve immediately. 


Notes/Results: Just a few simple ingredients but when they are fresh, you don't need much more. My avocados were a tad over-ripe but I think it works in their favor as they melt a little into the olive oil and vinegar, making a a creamy and delicious dressing.Bread would be excellent with this salad, or like me--you can eat it from the serving bowl, on the couch, and enjoy a bit of #metime with a good book. (Thank you to TLC Book Tours for the cool bookmark in the first picture!) ;-)


Linking this salad up at this week's Souper Sundays, here at Kahakai Kitchen, where anyone can share a soup, salad, or sandwich creation.


I'm also sharing this post with the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "The Woman in the Lake" was provided to me by the author and the publisher via TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.  
 
You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.
 

Sunday, October 21, 2018

Ruth's Roasted Tomato Soup with Cheese Toast for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

Yes, this is my third week of making a Ruth Reichl soup and this soup looks similar to last week's Perfect Fall Soup. But in my mind, you can never have too much soup and a good tomato soup is always welcome for a starter or for a meal--especially when you have a good toasted cheese bread for dunking. 


From Ruth's blog post titled Red and Robust,she says, "Incredibly easy, and extremely satisfying. I’m just hoping we don’t eat it all; this will be the most wonderful freezer find when the snow starts to fall."


Roasted Tomato Soup
Slightly Adapted from RuthReichl.com 
(Serves 4) 

2 lbs tomatoes (about 5), cored and cut into quarters
1/2 tsp sea salt, or to taste 
cloves garlic
2 onions, quartered
extra-virgin olive oil
1-3 cups water (I used the juices from the roasting + about 1 1/2 cups)
1/4 cup cream (I omitted--but it would certainly be welcome)

Heat an oven to 375 degrees

Place the tomatoes, onions, and garlic pieces on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper, shower with salt and splash generously with olive oil. Put into the oven for about an hour.

Squeeze the cloves of garlic out of their skins and put them, along with the tomatoes and onions into a blender or food processor. Add 1 1/4 cups water and blend. Add more water if you’d like thinner; I think 2 cups of water is about right, but you might like more or less.

Taste for salt, reheat a bit and then swirl in a little cream before serving.


Notes/Results: Just sweet and flavorful from all of the roasting and rich and delicious--a simple little tomato soup that doesn't need much else to make it a starter for a meal, or a light lunch. It's vegan if you don't drizzle the cream or use coconut milk and of course, skip the cheese bread or use good vegan cheese. This is perfect comfort food and I look forward to it in lunches this week. I'll happily make it again.


Linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where this week's theme is Snacks & Beginnings. I think a cup of this soup is a perfect beginning.


 Now, lets take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen:


Thankfully, Tina of Squirrel Head Manor weathered Hurricane Michael successfully although she had no power for several days. She still managed to eat well and says, "The charcoal grill has been a blessing, First night home Doug grilled burgers, I heated beans on the camping stove and made a salad.  We ate outside as the temperatures were a bit cooler." So happy you stayed safe, Tina!



Judee of Gluten Free A - Z Blog shared a perfect-for-fall Acorn Squash Server post on making a soup bowl from an acorn squash, She says, "If you are looking for a good idea for Thanksgiving, look no farther. Acorn Squash and mini pumpkins make beautiful decorative serving pieces for fall holidays!" Judee will be filling her squash bowls with the Roasted Chestnut Soup she shared last week. 

 
Shaheen of Allotment2Kitchen brought Savoury Purple Rainbow Carrot Rice Pilau and said, "I was quite surprised how the purple carrots bled into the white basmati rice and tainted it with a purple hue.  It actually looked quite pretty and quite nice to eat. ... As I had some left over, I decided to take some into work for lunch as a savoury rice salad dish.  You could reheat it in the microwave or eat it at room temperature."


Mahalo to all who joined in this week!
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:


  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).


 
Have a happy, healthy week!