Showing posts with label lemon. Show all posts
Showing posts with label lemon. Show all posts

Sunday, April 7, 2019

Ottolenghi's Cauliflower Soup with Mustard Croutons for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

I had a big head of cauliflower in the fridge that I hadn't gotten around to using this week so I knew it was destined for the soup pot. I googled cauliflower, soup and Yotam Ottolengi and found this recipe for Cauliflower Soup with Mustard Croutons online at his website. Like many Ottolenghi recipes, there are plenty of ingredients, but they are simple ones, and the soup is easy to put together.


Ottolenghi says, “These mustard croutons, adapted from those in Suzanne Goin's inspiring book Sunday Suppers At Lucques (Alfred Knopf, 2005), are a brilliant thing to have to hand and to sprinkle over gratins and salads. If you'd rather not make them, you'll need something else to perk up the soup: a teaspoon of rose harissa or some other savoury chilli sauce, swirled into each bowl before serving, would do the job perfectly well.


Cauliflower Soup with Mustard Croutons
(Serves 6)

2 Tbsp olive oil
10g (.35 oz) unsalted butter
5g (.18 oz) thyme sprigs
20g (.8 oz) parsley
Shaved skin of 1 lemon, plus grated zest of 1/2 lemon
1 large onion, peeled and thinly sliced
2 large celery sticks, cut into 3cm pieces
2 bay leaves
1 tsp caraway seeds
salt and white pepper
1 large cauliflower, broken into small florets
1 large potato, peeled and cut into 2cm dice
1.4 litres (about 6 cups) vegetable stock (or chicken stock for non-vegetarians)
2 Tbsp chopped chives

For the mustard croutons:
90g (3 oz) unsalted butter
3 Tbsp Dijon mustard
3 tsp picked thyme leaves
3 tsp finely chopped parsley
150g (5 oz) crustless ciabatta, torn into 1cm pieces (I used sourdough)

First make the croutons. Heat the oven to 180C/350F/gas mark 4. Put the butter in a medium saucepan on a medium heat. When it starts to foam, whisk in the mustard, herbs and a quarter-teaspoon of salt, take off the heat, leave for a couple of minutes to cool slightly, then stir in the ciabatta. Spread out on a parchment-lined baking tray and bake for 12-15 minutes, until crisp. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. (Any you don't use for this dish, store in an airtight container.)

For the soup, put the oil and butter in a large saucepan on medium heat. Tie together the thyme, parsley and lemon skin (or put them in a tied-up muslin), and add to the pan with the onion, celery, bay leaves, caraway seeds, three-quarters of a teaspoon of salt and a quarter-teaspoon of white pepper. Cook for eight to 10 minutes, stirring often, until the onion is soft but has not taken on any colour. Add the cauliflower, potato and stock, bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for eight minutes, until the vegetables are cooked but still have some bite.

Use a slotted spoon to lift a third of the cauliflower out of the pan – avoid removing any potato – and set aside. Let everything simmer away for another five minutes, then remove the herb bundle and the bay leaves. Using a hand-held blender, or in a food processor, blitz the soup until smooth, return to the pan and add the reserved cauliflower pieces. Stir in the grated lemon zest and chives, and serve, sprinkling the croutons on top at the last minute.



Notes/Results: The mustard croutons are definitely the highlight of this simple soup--although the sou itself has good flavor from the herbs, lemon and caraway. I like that the soup isn't too thick and has a creamy texture and the bites of cauliflower florets, then the crispy croutons on top. It goes together easily--I started my soup while making my croutons, so it all came together relatively quickly. I would happily make it again. 


Linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where we are saying Welcome Back! to all of our nineteen IHCC featured chefs. Come join us!


And we have Tina hanging out with me in the Souper Sundays kitchen...
 

Tina of Squirrel Head Manor shared this Broccoli, Potato and Spinach Creamy Soup and said, "Anyway......I was fortunate enough to receive a cool new eBook called Soups and Stews recently and wanted to share one result for Souper Sunday. There will be more coming up. Here is the first recipe - a healthy broccoli potato and spinach soup.  Very creamy! ... This recipe comes from a new book Soups and Stews by the author Emily Brown. I will add more recipes and do a review soon."


Thanks to Tina for joining in!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

 
To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).
You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter
Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Sunday, March 3, 2019

Ottolenghi's Sour Lentil Soup (Adas Bil Hamoud) for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

On the hunt for a good, nourishing soup to help with a lingering cough and a newer sore throat and cold this weekend, I found Yotam Ottolenghi's Adas Bil Hamoud or Sour Lentil Soup. It looked simple to make and Ottolenghi is a master of flavors, plus lentils, potatoes, garlic and lemon are always favorite ingredients of mine.


Ottolenghi says, "Versions of this soup, in which lemon is king, are found all over the Arab world. Mine is ever-changing, depending on what kind of stock I have in my freezer, or herbs in my fridge, so feel free to play around with the ingredients as you see fit. I like my soup super lemony, but adjust this to your taste, too. If using vegetable stock, consider adding a couple of teaspoons of miso paste to enrich the broth"


Adas Bil Hamoud (Sour Lentil Soup)
Slightly Adapted from Yotam Ottolenghi via TheGuardian.com
(Serves 4-6)

200 g (7 oz) Brown or green lentils
110 ml (3 oz) olive oil 
2 large onions, peeled and finely chopped
5 cloves garlic, crushed
1 12 Tbsp cumin seeds (I used black cumin seed)
3 lemons, finely shave the skin off one into 5 strips, juice all three to get 75 ml (1/3 cup)
salt and black pepper to taste
3 firm, waxy potatoes (I used Yukon Gold), peeled and chopped into 4 cm pieces (about 650-700g or 2.5-3 lbs weight)
400 g (1 bunch) Swiss or rainbow chard, leaves and stalks separated and coarsely chopped
1 litre (1 quart) vegetable stock (I used 2 quarts water with vegetarian non-chicken broth paste)
1 1/2 Tbsp coriander leaves, finely chopped
2 spring onions, chopped at an angle

Put the lentils in a medium saucepan, cover with plenty of cold, lightly salted water and bring to a boil. Turn down the heat to medium and simmer for 20-25 minutes, until the lentils are nearly cooked but still retain a bite, then drain.

While the lentils are cooking, put 80ml oil in a large, heavy-based pot for which you have a lid, and put on a medium heat. Once hot, add the onions, garlic, cumin, lemon skin, two and a quarter teaspoons of salt and plenty of pepper. Cook for about 15 minutes, stirring often, until very soft and golden. Stir in the potatoes, lentils and chard stalks, pour in the stock and 800ml water, bring to a gentle simmer, then cover and leave to cook for 20 minutes, or until the potato is soft but still holds its shape.

Turn off the heat, stir in the lemon juice and chard leaves, and leave to cook in the residual heat for two or three minutes, until wilted. Divide between four bowls, drizzle over the remaining two tablespoons of oil, garnish with the coriander and spring onion, and serve hot.

Notes/Results: I really like this soup. The lemon (my three lemons gave me closer to 1/2 cup of juice and I used it all.) brightens up the lentils and chard, and the potatoes give it a stew-like feel. It also made me realize that I need to cook more Swiss Chard--the stems are like flavorful celery and the leaves are not as bitter as some other greens. I did almost double the broth in this one as the lentils will soak it up as it sits. I served the soup with rice, but it is hearty enough to enjoy on its own. I would happily make it again. 


Linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where it is Potluck week--any recipe from any of our IHCC chefs.

And for Souper Sundays...


Elizabeth of Literature and Limes shared Crock Pot Beef Stew inspired by a recent read Educated by Tara Westover and said, "I decided to make a slow-cooked stew for this book. After the death of Tara’s paternal grandmother, Tara’s mom comes home to make stew for the family. The stew just has this homey feeling, which I feel like was likely a lot of what Tara had to eat growing up – homey food."


Here at Kahakai Kitchen, I made a book-inspired Avocado Caprese Salad that was a tasty weeknight meal with the fresh mozzarella, grape tomatoes, fresh basil and avocado. I am lucky enough to get these ingredients year-round, if you aren't , definitely make this dish in the summer. I will be making it again and again. 


Thanks to Elizabeth for joining me this week!  

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...


To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Sunday, October 7, 2018

Ruth Reichl's Avgolemono Soup (Take Two): Revisiting a Favorite for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

Avgolemono soup, that Greek comfort soup of lemon, eggs and rice is one of my favorites. You'll find several recipes for it, both regular and vegan versions on this blog. You'll even find Ruth Reichl's version (here) from her My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life. I don't usually post the same exact soup recipe twice--at least not knowingly, but when I was looking for a dish to welcome Ruth and kick off cooking her recipes at I Heart Cooking Clubs, it's what I wanted. And, it is my birthday so I believe I can have what I want! ;-)


Because I had a carrot to use up, I added it to the soup--mostly for its pop of color, but really, you can't miss with the basics here. A good, non--broken, perfectly creamy avgolemono is like a hug. 


Avgolemono Soup
Slightly Adapted from My Kitchen Year by Ruth Reichl
(Serves 6)

6 cups chicken stock (I used a veggie, non-chicken soup base paste)

(I added 1 medium carrot, diced)
1/3 cup rice (I used 1/2 cup)
1 lemon
4 eggs
salt
(I garnished with Pecorino-Romano cheese and finely chopped fresh dill)  

Bring the stock to a boil. Add the rice, lower the heat to a simmer, and cook for 20 minutes.

Meanwhile grate the rind from the lemon into a bowl, then squeeze the lemon and add the juice to the rind. 

Separate the eggs, dropping the yolks into the lemon juice. (Save the whites for another purpose/use.) Add a pinch of salt and beat the yolks into the lemon juice and rind.

When the rice is tender, whisk about half a cup of the hot stock into the yolks, then slowly pour the yolks into the soup, stirring constantly. Cook gently for about 5 minutes, or until the soup is slightly thickened. Pour into bowls and eat slowly.  


(Ruth says she serves her Avgolemono with a drizzle of olive oil and grated Parmesan cheese. I used Pecorino-Romano cheese and a little dill.


Notes/Results: I you have never made this soup, try it. If you have made it, make it again. It's so creamy and lemony and tastes like sunshine. The trick is beating your eggs well and really tempering them with the broth before you stir it into the soup so the eggs don't cook into little bits and everything is gloriously smooth. Other than that, it is a pretty effortless soup that you can make mostly from the pantry when you need a comforting dinner quickly. I am always happy to make this soup and Ruth's version is a good, simple one.


As mentioned, we are saying Bon Appetit, Ruth Reichl! and cooking along with her for the next six months at IHCC. Come join us--you can cook along each week, or join in just on the themes you like. Check it out, here.

  
Now, lets take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen:


Judee of Gluten Free A - Z Blog shared this fall-fantastic Instant Pot Acorn Squash and Apple Soup and said, "It's fall and I am eager to start enjoying the beautiful seasonal produce in my soups! Gala apples and acorn squash are two favorites that are key players in this light autumn soup recipe. I was able to get 2 pound bags of organic apples very reasonably priced at Trader Joe's this week. In addition, the farmer's markets are starting to display their colorful winter squashes. ... Personally, I prefer the soup seasoned with cumin. However, many friends enjoyed it a little sweeter with cinnamon. Both ways are good. It's your choice."


Wendy of A Day in the Life on the Farm is back at Souper Sundays this week with her Baked Potato Soup in the Crockpot. She said, "Creamy and flavorful potato soup simmers all day long in the crockpot.  You come home to a delicious smelling house and dinner is on the table before you know it.  Topped with all the things that make a perfect baked potato.....cheese, sour cream and bacon, this soup is a winner."


Debra of Eliot's Eats brought Olive Tapenade and Crostini and Olive Sandwiches inspired by a recent read. She said, "I finally landed on two descriptions from the novel—“Baby wanted a green olive sandwich and yogurt” (25) regarding one of Cerise’s cravings coupled with a later passage showing Eldris’ clueless-ness about her and Richard’s monetary state: 'And when he finally did take me out to celebrate, he was pulling wads of cash out of his pockets like some mobster on TV. He ordered two vodka martinis before the appetizers even arrived. Appetizers, Violet. He won’t give me the money for new carpet, but he’ll order crostini and tapenade. (169)' ... Because of the whole “olive sandwich” angle, I am linking up with Deb’s Souper Sundays (with sandwiches and salads)!"


Tina of Squirrel Head Manor battled a stressful week but still managed to bring Carole's Pasta Salad. She said, "A few weeks ago I saw a post at Carole's Chatter for her toss together Pasta Salad. The salad was good and instead of following her recipe to the letter, I added corn and tomatoes. Recipes are just guidelines and suggestions for me. Yes, here are my blue lunch bowls again."

 
Mahalo to all who joined in this week!
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:

  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).




Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Wednesday, September 26, 2018

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "The Impossible Girl" by Lydia Kang, Served Up with a Recipe for Smoked Oyster Pâté {Plus a Book Giveaway!}

Happy Wednesday! Here's to getting over the hump of this week and sliding closer to the weekend. Today I am very excited to be on the TLC Book Tour for The Impossible Girl, the new historical mystery novel by Lydia Y. Kang. Accompanying my review is an easy recipe for a Smoked Oyster Pâté, inspired by the many oysters in the mid 19th-century New York City setting. There's also a Rafflecopter giveaway for an opportunity to win a copy of The Impossible Girl at the bottom of the post. 


Publisher's Blurb:

Two hearts. Twice as vulnerable.

Manhattan, 1850. Born out of wedlock to a wealthy socialite and a nameless immigrant, Cora Lee can mingle with the rich just as easily as she can slip unnoticed into the slums and graveyards of the city. 

As the only female resurrectionist in New York, she’s carved out a niche procuring bodies afflicted with the strangest of anomalies. Anatomists will pay exorbitant sums for such specimens—dissecting and displaying them for the eager public.

Cora’s specialty is not only profitable, it’s a means to keep a finger on the pulse of those searching for her. She’s the girl born with two hearts—a legend among grave robbers and anatomists—sought after as an endangered prize.

Now, as a series of murders unfolds closer and closer to Cora, she can no longer trust those she holds dear, including the young medical student she’s fallen for. Because someone has no intention of waiting for Cora to die a natural death.

Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (September 18, 2018)
Publication Date: September 18, 2018

My Review:

OK, to get it out of the way and get on to the book review ... I LOVE the cover of this book! The color, the design, the way it fits the slightly macabre mystery vibe--Lydia Kang has some very cool book covers. I am also fascinated by early medical practices and oddities and as in her previous historical thriller, A Beautiful Poison (reviewed here), the author makes good use of her medical degree and detailed research in The Impossible Girl. Cora Lee has a very big secret, she is the whispered about medical oddity, a girl born with two hearts--something that both physicians and side shows would pay a large amount of money to display. This makes Cora's job as ironic as it is unusual--she is the city's best and only female grave digger or ressurectionist, with her gang she digs up the bodies of wealthy, deceased New Yorkers with medical abnormalities, from a young woman with a four-inch tail and an unusually tall gentleman with "abnormally long limbs and fingers," to a woman with a neck tumor that has hair and teeth. Cora has a list of these potential finds and waits for word of their passings, but it seems like the bidders for these bodies are impatient as mysterious deaths are claiming Cora's list and rumors about the "impossible" two-hearted girl are growing. 

There is history, science, mystery and romance in The Impossible Girl. Cora is a great character and I happily followed her story, looking for clues as to who in Cora's circle might be betraying her. I had some parts figured out, but there were surprises and Lydia Kang had me fully engaged and entertained by Cora's world. Her research is detailed and her vivid descriptions and writing bring the history and certainly the science to life. If you like mysteries that lean to the dark side and explore both the underbelly and the higher societies of New York, and you don't mind a bit of murder, medical details, and creepy grave robbing thrown in, you will enjoy this one--it's a fun ride and a great book for a dark October night. (Don't forget to enter the giveaway to win a copy for your shelves below!)

-----

Author Notes: Lydia Kang is a physician and the author of A Beautiful Poison. She was born in Baltimore, Maryland, and graduated from Columbia University and New York University School of Medicine. She currently lives in the Midwest with her family, where she continues to practice internal medicine. Visit her at www.lydiakang.com.

Connect with Lydia on her blog, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram


-----

Food Inspiration:

There is a lot of food in The Impossible Girl--a good portion of it oyster-related (see note below). Mentions included pork joint, pastries, flour, boiling soup, meat pies, pudding, blueberries and blackberries, coddled eggs, currant buns, moldy bread, a dinner of pork roast, boiled potatoes and flour biscuits, bread and cheese, peppermint candy, roast goose, roast beef, clam soup with extra bread and butter, mutton and taters, "fine Croton water" (The Old Croton Aqueduct was a large and complex water distribution system constructed for New York City between 1837 and 1842), malt liquor, brandy and German lager, cakes, raspberry cordial, coffee, a warm, sweet loaf speckled with raisins, and sweet buns, punch, baked eggs, tiny pies--both savory and sweet including oyster, egg and ham pies, treacle, cheese and crabapple jelly, beef tea (broth), jam, buttery gruel, gin, wine, baked eggs, tea, slices of roast ham and bread, apples, chicken, whiskey, rum, iced cake, and plain buns from the bakery. Oyster mentions from the various saloons included a plate of raw oysters and oysters fried, baked, stewed, roasted, stuffed in a fowl, oyster pie, and duck in oyster sauce, and a steaming plate of oysters, dotted with black pepper.


Sometimes a book calls for a certain dish or ingredient. In this case it was definitely oysters as their consumption at seedy oyster cellars and bars were a key setting in the book. Here's a fun article from the New York Times on the abundance and popularity of oysters in the mid 19th-century: City Lore: When the Oyster Was Their World by Mark Kurlansky. I knew I wanted my dish to center around oysters and since good, fresh or fresh-frozen oysters are not that easy to get reasonably here, I wanted to make something with canned oysters. Other criteria was it had to be fast-to-make and something I would eat (oysters and I are a bit tentative in our relationship--we hang out very occasionally if we must, but don't gravitate to each other). My mom used to make oyster stew, but it's just too humid for that and so I decided to forgo any historical accuracy of recipe and go for a more modern and easy dip. There were plenty of recipes to be found but I liked the sound and ingredient list of the Smoked Oyster Pâté recipe I found at Food52. I made two tiny changes--noted in red below.
 

Smoked Oyster Pâté 
Very Slightly Adapted from Waverly via Food52.com
(Serves 4-6)

1 8 oz tub cream cheese
3 Tbsp milk (+ more if needed)
4 Tbsp green onions, finely chopped white and some green parts
3 tsp Worcestershire sauce, or to taste
2 tsp Tabasco sauce, or to taste (I used about 3 tsp)
(I added 1 tsp lemon juice, or to taste)
1 clove garlic, finely chopped
1 Tbsp flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
1 (4 oz) can smoked oysters, drained and chopped
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

In a medium bowl, pour the cream cheese, milk, green onions, Worcestershire, Tabasco, garlic, and parsley. Stir to combine. If the mixture seems too thick, thin it with a teaspoon or two more milk. (It should be thick but everything should be evenly blended.) Fold in the oysters. Season to taste with salt and pepper.


Notes/Results: I found this to be a tasty little spread. I realize that oysters are not everyone's 'thing' and if you detest them or can't eat them this is likely not the recipe to win you over but, if you are lukewarm or on the fence it could move you into the oyster appreciation camp. It's hard to argue with cream cheese, Worcestershire sauce and Tabasco and what they do with the smoky oysters. I did add extra Tabasco as well as a bit of fresh lemon juice to brighten things up and liked it it with the hint of lemon. The flavors on this one do get better after it sits, so make it ahead. Food52 recommends buttered and toasted baguette slices which would be nice but I also liked the crunch of the poppy seed & black pepper crackers and crisp cucumber.   


I'm sharing this post with the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "The Impossible Girl" was provided to me by the author and the publisher, via TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.

You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.


 

***Giveaway!***

The publisher is generously providing a copy of "The Impossible Girl" to give away (U.S. addresses only, sorry) here at Kahakai Kitchen.

To enter the Rafflecopter Giveaway below, leave a comment (Because I like to read them!) ;-) telling me a period of history you enjoy reading about OR a food you like that others don't AND/OR why you'd like to win a copy of "The Impossible Girl."


There are a couple of other optional ways to get more entries to win: 1) Tweet about this giveaway or 2) follow me on Twitter (@DebinHawaii)
and/or author Lydia Kang (@LydiaYKang). (Note: You can still get extra entries even if you already follow these accounts.)

Deadline for entry is midnight (EST) on Wednesday, October 3rd.

 
a Rafflecopter giveaway  
Good Luck!