Showing posts with label eggplant. Show all posts
Showing posts with label eggplant. Show all posts

Thursday, April 25, 2019

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "The Eighth Sister" by Robert Dugoni, Served with a Recipe for Smoky Eggplant Spread, Marbled Rye Toasts & Pickled Veggies

I can't believe how quickly this week has flown by, and that it's is already Thursday. Just one more day until the weekend can begin. If you are looking for a suspenseful weekend read, try the latest Robert Dugoni book, The Eighth Sister. I'm reviewing it as today's stop on the TLC Book Tour and I am pairing my review with a recipe for a Smoky Eggplant Spread, accompanied by toasted marble rye and pickled vegetables, and inspired by my reading.


Publisher's Blurb:

A pulse-pounding thriller of espionage, spy games, and treachery by the New York Times bestselling author of the Tracy Crosswhite Series.

Former CIA case officer Charles Jenkins is a man at a crossroads: in his early sixties, he has a family, a new baby on the way, and a security consulting business on the brink of bankruptcy. Then his former bureau chief shows up at his house with a risky new assignment: travel undercover to Moscow and locate a Russian agent believed to be killing members of a clandestine US spy cell known as the seven sisters.
 
Desperate for money, Jenkins agrees to the mission and heads to the Russian capital. But when he finds the mastermind agent behind the assassinations—the so-called eighth sister—she is not who or what he was led to believe. Then again, neither is anyone else in this deadly game of cat and mouse.
 
Pursued by a dogged Russian intelligence officer, Jenkins executes a daring escape across the Black Sea, only to find himself abandoned by the agency he serves. With his family and freedom at risk, Jenkins is in the fight of his life—against his own country.

Hardcover:
Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (April 9, 2019)


My Review:

I am a huge fan of Robert Dugoni's Tracy Crosswhite series and feel like I am often anxiously awaiting the newest one. I hadn't ventured into Dugoni's other books because of my over-full TBR lis, but when I heard this was the start of a new series, I quickly jumped on the tour. Me being me and me being very anal retentive about reading series books in order, I was bit dismayed to learn that Charlies Jenkins, the main character in The Eighth Sister, is a secondary character in the author's David Sloane series. I think that there is enough explanation of the relationship in this book that you don't need to have read the David Sloan books first, but dogonnit, Dugoni made me curious, and now I want to and thus the TBR pile grows again ;-)

Charlie Jenkins is ex-CIA and living in Washington with his younger wife, young son, and a baby on the way. Disillusioned by his service to his country and how it ended, he is running a security firm with his wife when his old bureau chief tracks him down and asks him to reactivate and go undercover in Russia to find the leak behind a very secret spy ring known as the Seven Sisters, before more of these undercover agents are killed. Charlie doesn't want the assignment but his business is going under and he needs the money. so he heads to Moscow. Things do not go well and soon he is fighting to get out of Russia and to clear his name. 

Dugoni does an excellent job of building the pace and suspense throughout the story. making it a fast read for a thick book, as I didn't want to put it down and may have chewed down a couple of fingernails. I don't generally choose spy novels to read but i liked the way The Eighth Sister was both a spy thriller and a legal thriller with both the scenes in the filed and the courtroom scenes equally gripping. Charlie Jenkins is a great character, as were the supporting characters--his wife Alex, son CJ and the aforementioned David Sloane, and I look forward to spending more time with them in future books. I find Russia fairly fascinating and Dugoni's afterword about his inspiration for the book including a trip he made to Russia with his family in 1998 and some of their experiences was an interesting read as well. If you have not read Dugoni, you can't go wrong with either his Tracy Crosswhite books or this new series and I have a feeling his other books are equally as well done. (I'll let you know!)


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Author Notes: Robert Dugoni is the critically acclaimed New York TimesWall Street Journal, and Amazon bestselling author of the Tracy Crosswhite Series, which has sold more than 4 million books worldwide. He is also the author of the bestselling David Sloane Series; the stand-alone novels The 7th CanonDamage Control, and The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell, for which he won an AudioFile Earphones Award for the narration; and the nonfiction exposé The Cyanide Canary, a Washington Post Best Book of the Year. He is the recipient of the Nancy Pearl Award for Fiction and the Friends of Mystery Spotted Owl Award for best novel set in the Pacific Northwest. He is a two-time finalist for the International Thriller Award, the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction, the Silver Falchion Award for mystery, and the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Award. His books are sold in more than twenty-five countries and have been translated into more than two dozen languages.

Connect with Robert on his website, Facebook and Twitter.

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Food Inspiration

There is so much action in this book and Charlie has little time to eat, but there were a few food mentions like pastries and veal with onions, junk food--chips, donuts, candy, granola bars, crackers, cheese, juice and chocolate bars, strong Turkish coffee, lamb with rice, scrambled eggs with onions and pepper and bread, cinnamon rolls, Thai food--chicken pad Thai, tom yum soup, and phat khing, and homemade tacos. 

There is one scene where Jenkins is meeting with his Russian contact Federov and they share a plate of appetizers at a restaurant:

"The man set a plate of appetizers on the table. speaking while gesturing. 'Rye bread bruschetta with eggplant spread. marinated mushrooms, and pickled vegetables. Naslazhdat'sya.'

Federov picked up a piece of the bruschetta and spread the eggplant with a butter knife. 'Please,' he said, gesturing to Jenkins. 'You will enjoy.' 

Jenkins chose the bruschetta and spread, mimicking whatever Federov ate."

There were marinated mushrooms mentioned and of course vodka. So I decided to make my book-inspired dish as a nod to the appetizer plate and especially the eggplant spread. 


When I looked up Russian eggplant spread, I found many recipes for it, often called Baklazhannaia Ikra (poor man’s caviar) or eggplant caviar. The recipes varied slightly in ingredients and sometimes spices and i ended up going with one of the simplest--just eggplant, onion and tomato paste with oil, salt and pepper. The flavor comes more from the roasting of the eggplant and the caramelizing of the onions.


Smoky Eggplant Spread
From Emily Han, via TheKitchn.com
(makes about 4 cups

2 large eggplant (about 1 lb each)
olive oil
1 large sweet onion, chopped
about 6z/3/4 cup tomato paste
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Prick the eggplants all over with a fork and place on a foil-lined baking sheet. Roast in the center of the oven, turning over once, until soft, about 1 hour.
 

Let the eggplants cool in a colander in the sink, where their juices can drain. When cool enough to handle, press any excess liquid out. (This step helps to reduce any bitterness.)
Meanwhile, heat 1/4 cup of oil in a skillet over medium heat. Cook the onions, stirring occasionally, until soft and translucent, about 20 minutes.
 

Cut the eggplants in half and scoop out the flesh. Discard the peel. Using a large knife, chop the flesh very finely. (Avoid using a food processor, as you want the eggplant to be more textured than a purée.)
 

Add the eggplant to the onions along with the tomato paste, 3/4 teaspoon salt, and a couple good cracks of black pepper. Turn the heat to low-medium and cook, stirring frequently, for 10-15 minutes. Add more oil as necessary to prevent the mixture from sticking to the pan. (Be liberal with the oil; any excess will rise to the top as the mixture cools, and you can remove it then, if you wish.)
 

Transfer the mixture to a heat-proof bowl and let it cool completely before storing in the refrigerator. Adjust salt and pepper to taste before serving.


Notes/Results: With so few ingredients, I was surprised just how flavorful this eggplant spread was--and how good. Slightly smoky, and a bit sweet from the onion, it was really good hot, warm and cold and I think it will make a fabulous sandwich spread. I served mine on marbled rye toast points and with a small assortment of pickled and marinated veggies from the olive bar at my local grocery store (including some very spicy marinated mushrooms), which made a nice contrast to the eggplant spread. I will happily make this spread again.


I'm sharing this post with the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "The Eighth Sister" was provided to me by the author and the publisher via TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.  
 
You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.

 

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "Within These Lines" by Stephanie Morrill, Served with a Recipe for Grilled Eggplant with Orange-Miso Sauce

I am very excited to be today's stop on the TLC Book Tour for Within These Lines by Stephanie Morrill, a touching and absorbing young adult World War II novel. Accompanying my review is a recipe inspired by my reading, Grilled Eggplant with Orange-Miso Sauce


Publisher's Blurb:

From Stephanie Morrill, author of The Lost Girl of Astor Street, comes Within These Lines, the love story of a girl and boy torn apart by racism during World War II.
 
Evalina Cassano’s life in an Italian-American family living in San Francisco in 1941 is quiet and ordinary until she falls in love with Taichi Hamasaki, the son of Japanese immigrants. Despite the scandal it would cause and that inter-racial marriage is illegal in California, Evalina and Taichi vow they will find a way to be together. But anti-Japanese feelings erupt across the country after the attack on Pearl Harbor, and Taichi and his family are forced to give up their farm and move to an internment camp.
 
Degrading treatment makes life at Manzanar Relocation Center difficult. Taichi’s only connection to the outside world is treasured letters from Evalina. Feeling that the only action she can take to help Taichi is to speak out against injustice, Evalina becomes increasingly vocal at school and at home. 

Meanwhile, inside Manzanar, fighting between different Japanese-American factions arises. Taichi begins to doubt he will ever leave the camp alive.
With tensions running high and their freedom on the line, Evalina and Taichi must hold true to their ideals and believe in their love to make a way back to each other against unbelievable odds.

Hardcover: 352 Pages
Publisher: Blink (March 5, 2019)

My Review: 

I think it took me all of 30 seconds to sign up for this tour when I saw the email about it. If you ever read my reviews, you know that World War II historical fiction is a passion of mine and the mention of the Manzanar Relocation Center made me think of Farewell to Manzanar by Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston and James D. Houston, one of my favorite young adult memoirs. Starting in junior high, I checked that book out regularly for years until I bought my own copy. Several years ago I was thinking of it again and bought myself another copy (mine long since gone) at the library bookstore. The sheer horror of the U.S. government interning Japanese Americans in internment camp with Executive Order 9066 is something that pains me and our recent political climate makes the mistakes from the past chillingly relevant today. Although Within These Lines is a novel, it is based on fact, and Taichi and the Hamasaki’s experiences in the internment camps are gripping and moving.

The heart of the story is the relationship between Evalina and Taichi, in a hidden relationship already when the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor on December 7. 1941. The book starts three months after the attack, when anger at the Japanese is erupting and the government begins the process of moving families of Japanese descent to the camps. Evalina, an Italian-American and Taichi, a Japanese-American would have faced challenges even before the war, with most states having miscegenation laws prohibiting marriage between different races, but after the attack the odds seem insurmountable. Although a romance, the book is really about the characters and their personal growth—particularly Evalina, as she begins to find her voice. It is poignant and had me tearing up a few times, but there is hope in the pages too.

Within These Lines is well researched and well written, with the mostly fictional characters seamlessly blending with actual people interned at Manzanar. Stephanie Morrill wrote so vividly that I felt like I could see Manzanar and feel the intense winds and grit of the constantly blowing sand. Northern California during the WWII era comes alive too, and I could feel the desperation of the characters and the anger and bigotry against them by so many, as well as the hearts of those who tried to help them. Although written primarily for young adults, it’s a novel equally appropriate for adults. My only complaint is that the ending felt a bit rushed and I wanted to know more about the characters—main and supporting and learn more details about their lives after the war. Morrill writes in the afterword about her research and her inspiration for the book and that gave me more books to explore on this important part of our history that should be remembered and never repeated.
 
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Author Notes: Stephanie Morrill is the creator of GoTeenWriters.com and the author of several young adult novels, including the historical mystery, The Lost Girl of Astor Street. Despite loving cloche hats and drop-waist dresses, Stephanie would have been a terrible flapper because she can’t do the Charleston and looks awful with bobbed hair. She and her near-constant ponytail live in Kansas City with her husband and three kids. 

Connect with Stephanie on her website, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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Food Inspiration: 

The food in Within These Lines reflects the times, both in the San Francisco setting where Evalina’s Italian family owns a restaurant and the Hamasaki family grew produce, and in the Manzanar Relocation Center where the Hamasaki family is relocated to, and where Taichi works in the kitchen in his housing block. Mentions included jars of olives, strawberries, lettuce, asparagus, eggplant and blackberries, marinara sauce with veal and beef meatballs, onions and tomatoes, eggplant parmesan, tangerines, lemon bars and tea, mochi, chicken salad and egg salad sandwiches, gnocchi, linguine with clam sauce, Vienna sausages and bologna sandwiches with a side of rice and canned peaches, chicken with brown sauce , stew, deep-fried rice balls rolled in sugar, lemonade, lasagna, meat ball sandwiches, fresh mozzarella, carrot sticks, spinach, blueberries and strawberries, oatmeal, scrambled eggs, fennel, tomatoes and lemons, fish, cranberries, and rice pudding.


I thought about making mochi as the Hamasaki family eats it for breakfast on the day they are relocated to the camp. I also considered something with blackberries—Evalina’s favorites, or rice since it is a part of both Italian and Japanese cuisines or some type of Italian-Japanese fusion dish. Ultimately I decided that I needed to include the oranges that are mentioned several times in the book. Mrs. Ling, a vendor of Chinese descent who sells produce in the farmers market along side the Hamasakis, gives one to Evalina and tells her it is for luck. She says that oranges are the perfect fruit as they are the easiest to share, and Evalina and Taichi share them a few times throughout the book. When I was Googling orange recipes I found one for a Orange-Miso Sauce from Eating Well magazine. I liked the Japanese-leaning ingredients and that it was served over eggplant—used frequently in both Japanese and Italian recipes.

When I was at the grocery store, I saw some locally-grown eggplant, not as long as a Japanese eggplant and not as round as an Italian eggplant, and labeled “hapa” –which is literally translated in Hawaiian to “part” or “mix” and refers to a person of mixed ethnic heritage. That seemed like a perfect fit for a dish for Taichi and Evalina. 
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Eating Well says, “Mild, nutty flaxseed oil, the richest plant source of omega-3 fatty acids, provides the perfect base for salty miso and sweet orange juice. This sauce is delightful over grilled eggplant, fish and chicken or used as a salad dressing.

Orange-Miso Sauce
Recipe by Jim Romanoff via EatingWell.com
(Makes about 3/4 Cup)

1/2 cup sweet white miso
1 Tbsp orange zest
1/4 cup orange juice
1/4 cup flaxseed oil or canola oil
1 Tbsp minced fresh ginger
1 Tbsp rice vinegar
1 tsp mirin, (optional)

Combine miso, orange zest and juice, oil, ginger, rice vinegar and mirin (if using) in a small bowl and whisk until thoroughly blended.
 

Notes/Results: The sauce's orange & miso pairing is really good, especially with the addition of the rice wine and mirin and I liked the pairing with the eggplant. I am taking the leftover eggplant with some cooked shrimp to work for lunch as I think the sauce will pair well with seafood too. Rather than whisk my sauce, I did it the cheater's way and pulsed it in my blender. You must like orange and miso for this one, as the flavors come through predominately, but it worked for me and is an easy, almost pantry sauce as I usually have everything, including an orange or two, available. I will definitely make it again. 


I'm sharing this post with the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "Within These Lines" was provided to me by the author and the publisher via TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.  
 
You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.

 

Sunday, January 6, 2019

Eggplant Soup Parmigiana: Giving an Old Recipe a New Start for Souper (Soup, Salad, & Sammie) Sundays

I love going through vintage and retro magazines and cookbooks looking for recipes to try or to update which is why I love looking at RuthReichl.com. In her Ruth's Words, Reichl has posted lots of recipes from vintage cookbooks and old issues of Gourmet Magazine and it's fun to go through them.


In a post on three soups, the Eggplant Soup Parmigiana caught my eye. I liked the thought of giving a classic dish a new start as a soup and the "floating" tomato baked with Parmesan top sounded fun.

pics of Gourmet magazine clipping from RuthReichl.com

I did think that it needed a few changes, so I made them, noted in red below. Mainly I added canned fire-roasted tomatoes to add flavor and color, bumped the spices, pureed half of the soup in a blender, and thought that toasted bread crumbs would be a welcome addition to the topping. It turned out really well. (I may have to try that Basil Soup one of these days too...)  


Eggplant Soup Parmigiana 
Adapted from Gourmet Magazine, September 1977 & RuthReichl.com
(Serves 4)

2 Tbsp butter (I reduced from 3 Tbsp)
1 1/2 cups chopped onion
1 1/2 tsp minced garlic (I used 3 large cloves)
2 lbs eggplant coarsely chopped (I used Japanese eggplant)
2 cups chicken stock (I used non-chicken bouillon paste & water)
(I added 1 can diced fire roasted tomato, plus the liquid)
1/4 cup minced parsley
1/2 tsp oregano (I used 1 tsp + I tsp dried basil)
sea salt and black pepper to taste
4 slices of fresh tomato
Parmesan cheese, grated--about 1/2 cup
(I added Toasted bread crumb--about 1/4 cup)

In a large soup pot, add the butter and saute the onion and garlic over medium-high heat until softened. Add the eggplant, broth, chopped tomatoes and their juices, parsley, oregano, salt and pepper to taste and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cover, simmering the soup for about 30 minutes. Taste and add additional seasoning as needed. (I decided to blend about half of the soup in my blender to give it a thick and chunky consistency.)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Ladle soup into ovenproof bowls and float a tomato slice on each. Top each with 1 Tbsp toasted breadcrumbs & 2 Tbsp grated Parmesan cheese and bake about 10 minutes or until cheese is bubbling and golden.


Notes/Results: This soup smells so good cooking and has all of the flavor of Eggplant Parmigiana too--even if it may not be the prettiest soup out there. If you use the tomato, or even replace it with bread, you may want to serve it with a knife for cutting as it gets a tad messy. I liked the addition of the tomatoes--it made it more like the dish I am used to making and pureeing the soup made the texture nice and hearty. It would be good with some garlic bread to sop up the broth. I would happily make it again.


Linking up with I Heart Cooking Clubs where this week's theme is A New Start.

 
Now let's take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen:

 
Tina of Squirrel Head Manor brought hearty Taco Chili and says, "This is my first submission for Souper Sunday in 2019. I hope to participate most Sundays and try new soups, stews, chili, salads and sandwiches. That's a good goal for the new year and will keep me on track eating healthier. ... This is a Taco Chili that was inspired from Everyday Dorie: The Way I Cook.  Lucky me, I won a copy from The Book Club Cookbook. Thank you!"



Shaheen of Allotment2Kitchen is back at Souper Sundays with Cream of Parsnip Soup with Lemon. She says, "Over the festive season I decided to make the Cream of Parsnip Soup with Lemon. I served it with homemade sourdough bread. ... Sarah Beattie's original recipe for this soup is made with cream, but I felt the soup once blitzed was naturally thick and creamy, so I decided to omit the addition of cream. I think this is the kind of soup you ant to be tucking into when you are feeling a bit under the weather or a little poorly. It was a very warming soup with uplifting undertones of ginger and lemon."


Thank you Tina & Shaheen for joining in this week! 
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...


To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).
 


 Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Sunday, November 4, 2018

Ottolenghi's Puy Lentil and Eggplant Stew (Topped with Yogurt & Fresh Oregano) for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

Upon spying the new Ottolenghi Simple cookbook on my library's shelves I immediately grabbed it and was the first to check it out--always a treat. I know that I will end up buying a copy of my own (it's Yotam Ottolenghi after all), but it's always fun to try out a cookbook first. 


This book is full of Ottolenghi recipes that are a bit more "streamlined" and recipes are coded by letters that identify short on time, 10 ingredients or less, make ahead, pantry, lazy, and easier than you think--making this book perfect to grab when you don't know what to cook but still want the signature flavor combinations of this fantastic chef. I wrote down a ton of recipes I want to make including Scrambled Harissa Tofu, Avocado Butter on Toast with Tomato Salsa, Pea, Za'atar and Feta Fritters, Zucchini, Thyme and Walnut Salad, Burrata with Grilled Grapes and Basil, Hit Charred Cherry Tomatoes with Charred Yogurt, Curried Egg and Cauliflower Salad, Spinach and Gorgonzola Stuffed Baked Potatoes, Orzo with Shrimp, Tomato and Marinated Feta, Fish Cake Tacos with Mango, Lime, and Cumin Yogurt, Trout Tartare with Brown Butter and Pistachios, Sumac Roasted Strawberries with Yogurt Cream, and Honey and Yogurt Set Cheesecake--just to name a few. ;-) 

The Puy Lentil and Eggplant Stew seemed a great way to use up the last of a bag of the small green lentils.I made a few changes based on what I had on hand or could readily get and my changes are in red below.


Ottolenghi says "Serve the stew either as a hearty starter or a side, or else as a main, served with any grain you like. The stew can be made up to three days ahead and kept in the fridge--just warm through and add the creme fraiche, oil, chile flakes, and oregano before serving."

Puy Lentil and Eggplant Stew
Slightly Adapted from Ottolenghi Simple
(Serves 4 as a Starter)

3 Tbsp olive oil, plus extra to serve
3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced (I used 4 cloves)
1 large red onion, finely chopped (about 1 cup)
1 1/2 tsp thyme leaves
salt
2 small eggplants cut into chunks about 2 3/4-inches (6 cups) (I used Japanese eggplant)
7 oz cherry tomatoes (I used grape tomatoes)
black pepper
3/4 cup + 2 Tbps puy lentils (I used 1 heaping cup)
2 cups vegetable stock (I used 4 cups)
1/3 cup dry white wine (I used 1/2 cup)
1 3/4 cups water (I used 2 cups)
6 Tbsp creme fraiche (I used kefir labne--thickened yogurt)
1 tsp Urfa chile flakes or or 1/2 tsp other red pepper flakes (I used Aleppo pepper)
2 Tsp oregano leaves

Put 2 Tbsp of oil into a large high-side pan or soup pot and place over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, onion, thyme, and 1/4 tsp salt and fry for 8 minutes, stirring often, until soft and golden. Tip into a bowl, leaving the oil behind. Set aside.

Place the eggplant and tomatoes in a bowl and season with 1/4 tsp salt and plenty of pepper. Add the remaining 1 Tbsp of oil to the same pan (don't worry about wiping it clean) and, once very hot, add the eggplant and tomatoes are beginning to blacken. Return the garlic and onion to the pan, then add the lentils, stock, wine, water, and 3/4 tsp salt. Bring to a boil. Decrease the heat to medium and simmer gently for about 40 minutes, until the lentils are soft but still retain a bite.

Serve warm or at room temperature, with dollops of creme fraiche, a drizzle of oil, and chile flakes and oregano on top.


Notes/Results: A simple stew with a great combination of flavors and textures. The slightly toothsome lentils combined with the silky eggplant and sweet bursts of little tomatoes, the herbal notes from the thyme and fresh oregano and tangy yogurt, along with the heat from the Aleppo pepper all work together. There are a couple of steps but you use the same pan and it goes together easily. I served it with rice for a light meal. I'm looking forward to the leftovers in my lunches this week and I will happily make it again. 


Linking up this Ottolenghi stew to I Heart Cooking Clubs where it is Potluck week--our chance to make any recipe from any of our IHCC chefs. 

 
Now, lets take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen:

 
It's always a pleasure to have Beth Fish Reads at Souper Sundays and this week she's sharing this Apple Walnut, Cranberry & Brown Rice Salad saying, "I made the following salad as a side dish for dinner one night and then it served as our lunch the next day. This was delicious and so perfect for fall. I plan to make this one all winter. I used dark balsamic vinegar (sue me!) and didn't chop the craisins. Though I did use black sesame seeds. Van Boven suggests you make the salad about an hour before serving so the flavors meld, but we ate it pretty much right away. This would make a fabulous buffet dish and would be easy to transport if you're asked to bring a side dish to a holiday pot luck."


Shaheen  of Allotment2Kitchen is here with a Vegetarian Philly Cheesesteak saying, "Yes this is a vegetarian food blog and what I share below may look freakishly like 'meat', but I assure you these are homemade seitan slices peaking out of this Philly Cheese 'Steak' or cheesesteak. I was looking for ways to use up my rather large batch of homemade seitan and it was whilst flicking  Mama Cherry's Soul Food in a Bowl that I stumbled upon a meat version."

 
At Kahakai Kitchen I had two sandwich dishes to share this week, both inspired by books. First is the DS Special, my vegetarian recreation of a sandwich made by best friends in their Delancey Street apartment is an unusual but delicious combination of chicken, lettuce, blue cheese, cranyberry and mayo. I made my version with vegan chicken meat and really enjoyed the combination of flavors.

 
Next I made a soup and sandwich combo and a new favorite toast--open-faced Cheese Toast with Smashed Soft-Boiled Egg on top. It was perfect as an easy dinner with doctored-up deli-bought Clam Chowder. So good!

 
Mahalo to all who joined in this week!
 
About Souper Sundays:


Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

 To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!