Showing posts with label cashew cream. Show all posts
Showing posts with label cashew cream. Show all posts

Sunday, December 11, 2016

(Vegan) Creamy Porcini Mushroom Soup for Souper Sundays

It's been one of those weekends. I have had a not great week with my asthma and although I thought it was getting better yesterday, it came to a head late last night so today, I have been mainly a couch potato when I haven't been sleeping. I finally got up and made this soup I was planning on because I already had the cashews soaking for the cashew cream and I didn't want the mushrooms to go to waste. Then I went and took a nap and got up to write this post. You can see the pattern of my day, so please excuse this late and quick post.
 

I like a good mushroom soup and this Creamy Porcini Mushroom Soup from the new The Superfun Times Vegan Holiday Cookbook by the always amazing Isa Chandra Moskowitz, uses cashew cream and dried porcini mushrooms for a rich and luxurious soup. I don't have the energy to type out the recipe, but if you are interested leave me a comment or shoot me an email and I'll get it to you.  (Update: I finally added the recipe!) 

Cream of Porcini Mushroom Soup
The Superfun Times Vegan Holiday Cookbook by Isa Chandra Moskowitz
(Serves 8)

1 oz dried porcini mushrooms
1 cup raw cashews, soaked in water for at least 2 hours and drained
5 ½ cups vegetable broth (purchased or homemade)
1 Tbsp cornstarch
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped
¾ tsp salt + a pinch, or to taste
3 garlic cloves, minced
½ tsp dried thyme
8 oz cremini mushrooms, cut into ¼-inch slices
¾ cup dry white wine
freshly ground black pepper
chopped fresh parsley or chives for garnish, optional
oyster crackers for serving

Put the porcinis in a blender and blend on high into a fine powder—this usually takes about a minute. Add the cashews, along with 3 cups of the vegetable broth and the cornstarch. Puree until completely smooth: this can take up to 5 minutes depending on the strength of your machine. If needed, periodically stop the blender to keep it from overheating, and scrape down the sides of the blender jar with a rubber spatula to make sure you get everything.

Preheat a 4-quart pot over medium heat, heat the oil and sauté the onion with a pinch of salt until softened, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic and thyme and sauté just until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the cremini mushrooms and cook, stirring often, until softened, about 5 minutes.

Add the white wine, the remaining ¾ teaspoon salt (or less depending on the saltiness of your vegetable broth), and several grinds of black pepper. Turn the heat up to a boil and reduce the liquid to about half. It should take 3 minutes or so once boiling.

Bring the heat back to medium and stir in the cashew cream mixture and the remaining 2 ½ cups vegetable broth. Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and cook until nicely thickened, about 7 minutes. Taste and adjust for salt and seasoning. Add a little water if it seems too thick. Garnish with parsley, if you like, and serve with oyster crackers.
  


Notes/Results: Rich, silky, and full of good mushroom flavor from ground dried porcini, this is an excellent creamy mushroom soup. As Moskowitz says, "It's a real trick of a recipe too, because the dried porcini powder makes the soup sooo fancy and flavorful, but then the regular old sliced creminis make it affordable." This is something you could serve to guest--vegan or omnivore--but not at all hard to make, just some prep time for soaking cashews. I would happily make it again.
 

We have some good friends in the Souper Sundays kitchen who shared some delicious dishes last week--let's have a look!


Melynda of Our Sunday Cafe shared Roasted Beet and Lentil Salad with Mint Dijon Vinaigrette and said, "If you like beets and/or lentils, I hope you give this salad a try, it really is so good. It is also perfect as a light supper or a meat-less entree if desired. This is adapted from a recipe found in Urban Pantry - tips & recipes for a thrifty, sustainable and seasonal kitchen. I had picked this book up, along with many others from our visit to the library last week. I upped the flavor with additional vinaigrette as the salad seemed a bit dry for my tastes and made a change in how the onions were presented, but the overall salad is right out of the book."



Claudia of Honey From Rock made a Winter Salad with Sesame Tahini Dressing inspired the book Picnic in Provence and said, "My choice of recipe was based mostly on needing food to bring to a Christmas party.  I liked that she said of this dish, it's "the only thing I can think of that I'd want to eat before Thanksgiving dinner.  That said, it would also make a lovely salad served with dinner itself."  A winter salad, in reds and greens - perfect for a Christmas party."



Tina of Squirrel Head Manor made this Healing Potato and Mushroom Soup when her husband got a nasty stomach bug and said. "Between washing my hands more than normal, disinfecting surfaces, laundry and reading.........I made soup. It was decided a homemade Potato Mushroom soup would be a good initial meal to reintroduce food to his empty tummy. The bonus was using the slow cooker.  This doesn't cook for a long period of time so it was beneficial that I could be home, attending to the cook time."



Shaheen of Allotment2Kitchen shared this Red Cabbage and Purple Potato Salad and said, "Another easy recipe made with the red cabbage pesto. This time stirred into some Welsh seasonal new potatoes and curly kale from the farmers market. Delish!"

 
Mahalo to everyone who joined in this week! 

Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.)

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:


  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you.

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • please mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post.
  • you are welcome to add the wonderful Souper Sundays logo (created by Ivy at Kopiaste) to your post and/or blog (optional).
 
Have a happy, healthy week!


Sunday, September 25, 2016

Mark Bittman's Creamy Spinach Soup (Made Vegan) for Souper (Soup, Salad, & Sammie) Sundays

There are weeks when you want to fuss over a pot of soup and there are weeks when you want something creamy and delicious, but you want it quickly. That's where Mark Bittman comes in. I have made a few of his "customizable soups" from this 2011 New York Times article and they are always easy and tasty. 


I had a big container of organic baby spinach that I have not been using as quickly as I should so I decided to make this Creamy Spinach Soup, which gets its creaminess and a nice tangy flavor from Greek yogurt. Because I limit my dairy for my asthma and allergies, I replaced the yogurt with some simple cashew creme, adding lemon juice to give it some tang. My changes to his recipe sketch are in red below.  


Creamy Spinach Soup
Adapted from Mark Bittman's via The New York Times
(Serves 4)

Put 1 chopped onion, 2 peeled garlic cloves, 3 cups water (I used light veggie broth) and salt and pepper in a pot over high heat. Boil, cover, lower the heat and simmer until the onion is tender, about 10 minutes. 

Add 10 ounces chopped spinach and 1/2 cup parsley leaves; cook until the spinach is tender, 2 to 3 minutes. Add 1 cup Greek-style yogurt (I used cashew creme with 1 tbsp lemon juice) and purée. Garnish: A spoonful of Greek-style yogurt (I used cashew creme) and chopped parsley.


Notes/Results:  Great flavor for just a few ingredients and a short amount of time. The brightness from the yogurt or in this case, cashew creme and lemon juice keep it from being too 'green' and spinachy and make it delicious. If you aren't interested in making this soup dairy/free or vegan and have yogurt, go ahead and use it, or if you didn't want to use cashew cream, add a plain non-dairy yogurt or sour cream. It's a flexible recipe. This is a great 'dipping soup'--I brushed a couple of thick pieces of French bread with olive oil and toasted them so they were crispy on the outside, soft inside. Perfect! It would also be great with a grilled cheese. I would happily make it again. 
 

I am linking this soup up at I Heart Cooking Clubs for Potluck week--our chance to make any recipe from our current or previous IHCC chefs. You can see what everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post.
 

We have some good friends in the Souper Sundays kitchen who shared some delicious dishes last week--let's have a look! 


Simona of briciole made this Slow-Roasted Heirloom Tomato Gazpacho for the Soup Swap Party Event and says, "The book arrived in time for me to make several batches of the gazpacho to adjust the recipe to my liking. In particular, I used shallot (scalogno) from my garden, roasted the pepper (peperone) and used my favorite varieties of cucumber (cetriolo). I also halved the amount of tomatoes, since I never made the recipe for a party."



Vicki of I'd Rather Be At The Beach made this Ham, Turkey, & Sharp Cheddar Panini and said, "I enjoy a good Panini once in a while, and this is a good one for when you don’t have a tomato or avocado on hand. I definitely would have added them if I’d had some, but this was still a yummy Panini. Sometimes it’s good to go simple."



Tina of Squirrel Head Manor made a hearty veggie rice skillet dinner and used the leftovers in these Pita Pockets with Rice and Veggies. She said, "There was enough for two main meals and one lunch. For our lunch we used whole wheat pitas stuffing them with fresh spinach, chopped tomato and the remainder of the rice skillet. Paired up with a yogurt and that was a satisfying lunch."
 

A big thank you to everyone who joined in this week!

Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.)

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:


  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you.

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • please mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post.
  • you are welcome to add the wonderful Souper Sundays logo (created by Ivy at Kopiaste) to your post and/or blog (optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Monday, August 22, 2016

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "Everything We Keep" by Kerry Lonsdale, Served with A Recipe for Zucchini & Summer Vegetable Fritters with Herbed Dipping Sauce

It's Monday again and I'm not sure how it got here so fast. A sure cure for any Monday blues is a good book paired with a tasty recipe. On today's TLC Book Tour, I'm reviewing the novel, Everything We Keep by Kerry Lonsdale and sharing a recipe for Zucchini and Summer Vegetable Fritters with a delicious creamy, herb dipping sauce inspired by the book. 


Publisher's Blurb:

Sous chef Aimee Tierney has the perfect recipe for the perfect life: marry her childhood sweetheart, raise a family, and buy out her parents’ restaurant. But when her fiancé, James Donato, vanishes in a boating accident, her well-baked future is swept out to sea. Instead of walking down the aisle on their wedding day, Aimee is at James’s funeral—a funeral that leaves her more unsettled than at peace.
 
As Aimee struggles to reconstruct her life, she delves deeper into James’s disappearance. What she uncovers is an ocean of secrets that make her question everything about the life they built together. And just below the surface is a truth that may set Aimee free…or shatter her forever.
 
A luminous debut with unexpected twists, Everything We Keep explores the devastation of loss, the euphoria of finding love again, and the pulse-racing repercussions of discovering the truth about the ones we hold dear and the lengths they will go to protect us.

Paperback: 304 pages
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (August 1, 2016)

My Review: 

Everything We Keep is an easy book to get swept up into. My heart immediately went to Aimee--who on the day she was set to marry her childhood sweetheart James, is instead  at the church for his funeral. After the funeral she is approached by a woman who says she has information about him and that he is alive. At first Aimee dismisses the information but a few months later, grief-stricken, struggling to move on with her life and having feelings that things might not be as they seem, she starts looking into Jame's disappearance and purported death in a boating accident in Mexico. It's at that point that the story moves from a woman overcoming loss and finding herself into a mystery-suspense novel. The secrets and twists were dark and absorbing and I found myself constantly guessing (with only partial success) what was going to happen next and where the story was going. There are some things that are not explained that well in the story and a few instances where I had to suspend at least a bit of logic and just go with the ride, but the twists and turns make that ride interesting and fun right up to the very end--which came with a bang and left me thinking about it for days after I finished the book. 

The fact that this is Kerry Lonsdale's debut novel is impressive. Her character development, pacing, and story building are excellent. I liked that this book mixed romance and drama with suspense in such a organic way. I think it will appeal to anyone who likes a well-told story that unsettles and keeps you wondering. A great pick for a beachy read or curling up on a rainy afternoon--just don't read it when you need to sleep or have responsibilities to attend to--you won't want to put it down! 

-----

Author Notes: Kerry Lonsdale believes life is more exciting with twists and turns, which may be why she enjoys dropping her characters into unexpected scenarios and foreign settings. She graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, and is a founder of the Women’s Fiction Writers Association, an online community of authors located across the globe. She resides in Northern California with her husband, two children, and an aging golden retriever who’s convinced she’s still a puppy. Everything We Keep is Kerry’s first novel.

Connect with Kerry on her website, Facebook and Twitter

-----

Food Inspiration:

With Aimee being a chef and opening her own coffee shop/cafe, there was definitely some good food inspiration throughout the book--even if it wasn't the focus. Breads were Aimee's specialty and she baked them for her parent's upscale pub, The Old Irish Goat, where rosemary roasted potatoes and whiskey-glazed corned beef and lamb stew and red potatoes were on the menu. There was mention of apple pie, salad, lemonade, margaritas, lemongrass and coconut candles, casseroles, cakes and cookies, coffee cake with cinnamon and maple syrup--and sour cream to make it light and tender, a carafe of sangria and a round of passion fruit champagne shots and hard cider, stews, tarts and breads taste-tested for Aimee's Cafe menu, lemon blueberry cake with cream cheese frosting, and Thai chicken panini with mixed greens. Aimee had a passion for mixing exotic beans and coffee syrups like her Pangi Hazelnut Latte--named after the region in India where the hazelnut was produced and adapted by Ian, or the specialty lattes and mocha's she served. In Mexico there were fish tacos and a Mexican salad, burgers and fries, grilled seafood and mangoes.
 

I narrowed it down to two menu items from Aimee's Cafe--a Mediterranean omelet--'overflowing with goat cheese, brine-cured olives, and fresh fennel and dill' and her chef Mandy's zucchini fritters that Amiee's mom said were delicious. The fritters weren't given much detail but it's summer, there's plenty of zucchini about and I do love me a good fritter. I was just going to make a plain zucchini fritter but saw a Curtis Stone recipe for Summer Vegetable Fritters that added potato, carrot and onion to the zucchini and had a tasty-sounding dill sauce to accompany them. I liked that the fritters were light with nothing but veggies with a little egg to hold them together, salt, and pepper

I kept the fritter recipe the same but switched the dipping sauce recipe a bit--using cashew creme for a non-dairy version and adding tarragon to the dill because I love it and had it on hand.
 
 
Vegetable Fritters
Adapted From Curtis Stone via The Today Show.com
(Makes 12 Fritters)

1 russet potato, peeled
1 carrot, peeled
1 zucchini, ends trimmed
1 onion, halved and very thinly sliced
2 tsp sea salt, or to taste
2 large eggs
freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup olive oil
1 cup sour cream (I used cashew creme + 1 Tbsp lemon juice & a pinch of salt)
1/4 bunch fresh dill, leaves coarsely chopped (about 1 1/2 Tbsp) (I used 1/2 dill, 1/2 tarragon)

Using a mandoline or julienne peeler, cut the potato, carrot, and zucchini lengthwise into long spaghetti-like strips. 


Toss the potato, carrot, zucchini, onion, and 2 teaspoons of salt in a medium bowl.Let the vegetable mixture stand for 10 minutes, or until the salt has drawn out some of the moisture from the vegetables. Place the vegetables in a colander to drain the excess moisture then squeeze the vegetables between your hands to exude as much moisture as possible.

Using a fork, beat the eggs and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper in a large bowl to blend well. Add the vegetables and stir to coat with the egg. 

Heat 1 1/2 tablespoons of oil in a large heavy sauté pan over medium-high heat. Working in batches and using about 1/4 cup of the vegetable-egg mixture for each, spoon the vegetable-egg mixture into the pan forming thin patties that are about 3-inches in diameter. Fry for 4 minutes on each side, or until the fritters are golden and crisp on the outside. Using a metal spatula, transfer the fritters to paper towels to absorb any excess oil.

Meanwhile, stir the sour cream and dill in a small bowl to blend. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Place the fritters on a platter and serve with the sour cream-dill sauce.
 

Notes/Results: These are really simple but really delicious veggie fritters where the vegetable flavor comes through and pairs really well will the dipping sauce. I like that they are mostly vegetables with just egg to hold them together and salt and pepper for flavoring. They actually held together pretty well, especially once I followed directions and made them small, like the recipe says. ;-) The dip was really good--I liked the addition of the tarragon to the dill and using the cashew creme with a bit of lemon worked perfectly in place of the sour cream. You could also use yogurt or mayo as a substitute too. With a spiralizer and if you use your salting time wisely, you can have these tasty little fritters on the table in 30 minutes, even with the 10-minute rest time. Just get your veggies salted early and while you wait, make the dressing, beat the eggs and pre-heat the pan and oil so you are ready to go once you have squeezed all the extra water out. I spiralized all of my veggies, even the onions in just a few minutes, then used scissors to cut them into smaller lengths. You could vary the veggies--although I think the zucchini, carrot, potato and onion were a good combination. Crispy on the outside, tender insides, I would definitely make these fritters again. 


Serving Note: I think these make a great appetizer but they are slightly fragile, so I suggest serving them plated with a bit of the dipping sauce on top or having small plates available to eat them on. Served on some baby arugula, a few of them make a nice summer starter to a meal. 


Because I made them in just under 30 minutes, I am linking these fritters up at I Heart Cooking Clubs where this week's theme is Express Meals: 30 Minutes or Less! You can see what quick Curtis Stone dishes everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post. 


I'm linking up this review and recipe to the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.


Note: A review copy of "Everything We Keep" was provided to me by the publisher and TLC Book Tours in return for a fair and honest review. I was not compensated for this review and as always my thoughts and opinions are my own.

You can see the stops for the rest of this Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.


 

Sunday, August 7, 2016

Diana Henry's Hungarian Chilled Cucumber & Dill Soup and Four More Favorite Diana Henry Soup Recipes for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

This coming week at I Heart Cooking Clubs we have the wonderful Diana Henry as our Monthly Featured Chef. That means this week we can make any of her recipes and/or share past Diana Henry recipes. We cooked with Diana back in October 2014 through March 2015 and she is one of my favorites. Her cookbooks are gorgeous, her food delicious, and she is a travel lover who has lots of globally diverse recipes. If you aren't familiar, you owe it to check her out--in addition to her cookbooks, she has plenty of recipes online--especially in the U.K. and on her website.


Her Hungarian Chilled Cucumber & Dill Soup can be found online and there is a version in her cookbook, Plenty. I have made similar soups in the past but had two cucumbers I wanted to use up and I love how cooling this soup sounded for a humid summer day. 


I did make a few changes to the recipe--making it vegan by switching out the stock and dairy and I also have no flour (of any kind) on hand currently (whoops!), so I added more potato to compensate for thickening--so it ends up being gluten-free as well. Changes are noted below in red.

Hungarian Cucumber & Dill Soup 
Adapted from Diana Henry via The Telegraph & Plenty
(Serves 4)

5g (1 oz) butter (I used vegan *butter*)
1 onion, finely chopped
2 cucumbers, peeled and diced (I left mine unpeeled)
50g (1 3/4 oz) potato, peeled and diced (I used about 3.5 oz)
1 1/2 Tbsp plain flour (I omitted & used extra potatoes)
300ml (10 fl oz) chicken stock (I used light veggie stock)

sea salt and white pepper to taste
1/2 tsp finely grated lemon zest + juice to taste
25g (1 oz) dill, chopped, plus extra sprigs to serve
150ml (5 fl oz) milk (I used almond milk)
2 Tbsp crème fraîche or sour cream (I used cashew cream)


Melt the butter in a heavy saucepan and add the onion, cucumber and potato. Cook gently for four minutes, then add a splash of water, cover and sweat over a low heat for 15 minutes until soft but not coloured. Keep an eye on it to make sure the onions are moist and don't catch and burn –it may need another splash of water. 

Stir in the flour and cook for a further two minutes over a gentle heat, still stirring, then add the chicken stock and season. Bring to the boil, reduce to a simmer and cook for 15 minutes. The vegetables should be completely soft. Stir in the lemon zest (and juice) and leave to cool. Purée with the chopped dill, milk and crême fraîche. Taste for seasoning. Chill before serving. 

If you are making this in advance and need to refrigerate it overnight, you might have to add more milk (and adjust the seasoning) just before serving, in case the soup has turned a little solid. Serve with sprigs of dill on top.


Notes/Results: I really liked this soup--it is ultra-creamy but not heavy and the flavor is light and tangy with the lemon and the dill. The cucumber is present but the dill is definitely the star. The recipe called for just lemon zest but I added juice because I like the extra brightness it added. There are some soups that work both warm and cold but this one is so much better when chilled--the flavors stand out much more. I think it would be lovely served for lunch with smoked salmon or cucumber sandwiches, or for a starter to a dinner with poached or grilled salmon. I would happily make it again.


As always, I like to share some of my top favorite recipes from our Monthly Featured Chef and I had many cooking with Diana. (Here's my official round up when we said 'goodbye' and switched to our next chef.) I thought since it's a soup post, this time I would concentrate on the soups that we cooked together.

My favorite soup had to be Diana's Moroccan Lentil Soup with Yogurt & Chilli-Fried Onions. So many layers of flavor and the chilli-fried onions are delicious and possibly addicting. I still think about them and this soup.


A close second was Diana's Niçoise Vegetable Stew with Rouille (With Fish or Without).
This soup has so fun flavor--like sunshine in a bowl and the garlicky rouille sauce sort of melts into the warm broth of the soup and gives it a silkiness and a big punch of flavor.


I made Diana's Eastern Broth with Lime and Herbs after we cooked with her and added spiralized carrot noodles to it. The broth has terrific flavor and it swell balanced. It made for a light and delicious dish.


Diana's Pea and Cilantro Soup with Red Chili Cream livens up a basic pea soup with cilantro and cumin and the topping of the chili cream--I used coconut creamer for mine. I added fried corn tortilla strips to the top for a little crunch.

  
Linking my soup up at I Heart Cooking Clubs Monthly Featured Chef Event post. You can see what Diana Henry recipes everyone made by clicking on the picture links on the post.  


Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.)

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.



 
Tina of Squirrel Head Manor shared this yummy-looking Avocado, Corn and Tomato Salad, saying, "Speaking of heat – here is a salad that mixes hot and cold ingredients that’s easy to make and bursts with flavor. So many complimentary ingredients but I learned a lesson – just make the amount you want to eat for one meal. It’s easy enough to recreate another night but doesn’t hold over all that well."


Vicki of I'd Rather Be At The Beach tried these Grilled Cheese Sandwiches Made with Mayo Instead of Butter and says, "Anthony and I both thought these tasted almost the same as when made with butter except that there was a slight sweet taste to it. We both said we’d rather stick with butter, but mayo would be good for anyone who wouldn’t mind a slightly sweet grilled cheese sandwich."


We have a new face at Souper Sundays (Thanks Tina!), Louise of Soup, Soup Glorious Soup (with a blog name like that, you know we will get along!), blogging from Australia. Louise made Glowing Spiced Lentil Soup and says, "Master Soup is currently vegan. It's not my choice. I've fully supported him being vegetarian for some years, but vegan is harder - especially for a non-vegan cook. A good lentil soup is always a thing of joy though and this one is lush and creamy because of the coconut cream." Welcome Louise!


Pam of Sidewalk Shoes shares two salads this week, the first is this version of Ellie Krieger's Curried Chicken Salad. Pam says, "Thanks to a well stocked fridge and pantry, I had everything I needed to make this salad! I love the combination of grapes, almonds and cilantro.  The dressing is made with yogurt, mayonnaise and curry powder. This would make an excellent salad for those of you that take a lunch to work. Or if like me you work from home, this was even better the next day. Just right before serving scoop it out onto a bed of greens." 


About her Heirloom Tomato Salad Pam says, "I have loved tomatoes for as long as I can remember. I remember as a child at my Aunt’s house, eating them like apples, still warm from the sun. Seeds and juice running down my arm. ... For this salad, I just thinly sliced some tomatoes, scalloped them all pretty, drizzled with some good olive oil, and my Garlic Blossom Vinegar, seasoned with salt and pepper and sprinkled with some baby basil leaves. I let it marinate at room temperature for about 30 minutes. Delightful."


Thanks to everyone who linked up last week!

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:


  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you.
On your entry post (on your blog):
  • please mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post.
  • you are welcome to add the wonderful Souper Sundays logo (created by Ivy at Kopiaste) to your post and/or blog (optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!