Showing posts with label One Photo Friday. Show all posts
Showing posts with label One Photo Friday. Show all posts

Friday, July 17, 2015

Bow-Tie Pasta with Fried Eggs and Gruyère {One Photo Friday}

Quick comfort food. There isn't much that's better. This Jacques Pépin recipe is simple, quick to the table, and with Gruyère cheese melting into the pasta, plus a couple of fried eggs on top, it's pretty perfect.  


Jacques says, "This is truly one of my favorite dishes to eat at home. Gloria and I like our pasta simply seasoned with the best possible olive oil, salt, pepper, chives, and Gruyère cheese, which melts from the heat of the pasta. Make sure that the serving plates--we use soup plates--are very hot."

I made a couple of minor changes to the recipe--noted in red below.

Bow-Tie Pasta with Fried Eggs and Gruyère
Adapted from Jacques Pépin: Fast Food My Way
(Serves 4) 

12 oz bow-tie pasta (farfalle) pasta (about 6 cups) (I used mini farfalle)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 Tbsp minced fresh chives (I used fresh tarragon)
1/2 tsp salt 
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Garnish:
2 Tbsp unsalted butter
8 large eggs (preferably organic)
About 1 1/3 cups (7 oz) grated Swiss (Gruyère or Emmenthaler)

Cook pasta to package instructions or until it is done to your liking. Meanwhile put the herbs, salt, and pepper in a bowl large enough to hold the cooked pasta. When the pasta is ready, remove 1/2 cup of the cooking water and add it to the bowl. Drain the pasta well, add it to the bowl, and toss well.

For the Garnish: Melt 1/2 tablespoon of the butter in each of two 6-inch non-stick skillets. Break 2 of the eggs into each skillet and cook, covered, over medium-high heat for about 2 minutes or just until the whites are set. Spoon a 6-ounce ladle of pasta into each of  two warmed plates and sprinkle on a heaping spoonful of cheese. Place the two eggs on top of the pasta, add a little more cheese, then a half ladle of pasta. (The egg yolks should still be visible through the top layer of the pasta.) Cook the remaining 4 eggs and assemble the two remaining plates in the same way. Serve immediately. 

You have to have at least one photo showing the egg yolk drizzling into the pasta.

Notes/Results: A bowl of pasta with melted cheese and herbs is good and almost always hits the spot, but nestle an egg into it, letting that silky yolk coat the cheesy pasta... and now you have something special. This is a great little recipe that can be adapted to whatever pasta, cheese and herbs you have in your pantry and pulled out whenever you want something comforting and delicious without a lot of effort. Jacques called for chives in his version but I love tarragon with eggs and had some in my fridge so I used it instead. Mini pasta is always more fun to eat--I love these little bow ties. I made a half batch of this dish and I cut the amount of oil and cheese down just a touch. I probably could have gotten along with just one egg--but it did give me plenty of that liquid gold to stir into my pasta. ;-) I will happily make this again.  


I'm linking this post to I Heart Cooking Clubs where it's Fast Food Jacques's Way this week and we are making Pépin recipes that take 30 minutes or less to cook. You can see what quick recipes everyone made by checking out the photo links on the post.

 {One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take (usually) one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.}  
 

Friday, March 13, 2015

Nigella's Farro Risotto with Mushrooms and Leeks {One Photo Friday}

It's Mystery Box Madness Challenge week at I Heart Cooking Clubs where we make a dish from Diana Henry or any former IHCC chef that must include at least three mystery ingredients out of a list of ten. 

March's Mystery Box Madness Ingredients:

Bacon 
*Mushrooms
*Thyme
Cucumber
Cumin
*Leeks
Apricots
Pistachios
*Ricotta 

Orange Flower Water

Initially, I was thinking of mushroom soup with the mushrooms, leeks and thyme but most of the recipes from our IHCC chefs seemed to have mostly mushrooms and thyme or mushrooms and leeks, and not all three at once. I could have swapped the leeks in for onions of course but I like the challenge of finding a recipe that already has the challenge ingredients that I need. My thoughts then went to mushroom risotto as you often find leeks there and viola... Nigella Lawson's recipe for Farro Risotto popped up. Not only did it have the thyme, leek and mushroom (crimini, porcini and porcini broth) combination that I was looking for, it added a fourth March MBM ingredient--ricotta. Winner, winner, risotto dinner!


Nigella says, "I'm on a campaign to make farro more widely known. For many of us it's a new food, but it dates back to the Etruscans. It's a fabulously easy way of making risotto because you don't need to stir it—you just put a lid on. And you can make it in advance. You feel that you're having the most indulgent Italian food, but it's a whole grain, so it's healthy. Afterward, it gives you a slow release of energy, and you aren't going to feel that sense of white-carb fatigue."

Farro Risotto with Mushrooms and Leeks
Adapted From Nigella Lawson via Health.com
(Serves 4-6)
 
1/2 cup dried porcini
1/2 cup recently boiled water
1/4 cup olive oil
1 leek (washed & trimmed), halved lengthwise & thinly sliced (I used 2 leeks)
2 3/4 cups pearled farro (perlato)
1/4 cup Marsala
5 cups broth, vegetable, chicken, or porcini (I used mushroom broth)
8 ounces crimini mushrooms
sliced leaves from a few sprigs of fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme (I used lemon thyme)
1 clove garlic, peeled (I used 2 cloves)
1/4 cup ricotta
1/4 cup grated Parmesan
3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, to serve 


Cover the dried porcini with 1/2 cup of recently boiled water, then fill the kettle and put it on the heat again if you are making up the broth with concentrate, cube, or powder. In a wide, heavy saucepan (that comes with a lid) add 2 tablespoons of the oil and the fine jade tangle of leek, and cook, stirring frequently, for about 5 minutes or until the leeks are softened.

Drain the porcini, reserving the soaking liquid, then chop them and add them to the pan. Stir well, then add the farro and turn it gently but thoroughly in the pan. Tip in the Marsala and porcini-soaking water and let it bubble up.

Make up the broth as wished and add this to the farro pan, stir, bring to a boil, and then clamp on a lid, turn down the heat, and let it cook at a simmer for 30 minutes, until the farro is cooked and all the liquid absorbed. (Note: I had to cook my farro about another 10 minutes with the lid off to absorb all of the liquid.)

While the farro is cooking, warm the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a medium-sized frying pan and cook the sliced crimini mushrooms for about 5 minutes or until they begin to soften (they will first seem alarmingly dry) at which point add the thyme, grate in (or mince and add) the garlic, and cook for a further 5 minutes or until the mushrooms are juicy and soft. Remove from the heat if there is still time on the clock for the farro. Once the farro is cooked, take it off the heat, too, and add the cooked mushrooms. Stir in the ricotta and Parmesan (they will melt in the heat of the farro) until the farro is creamy, then sprinkle with parsley and serve.

Nutritional Info (Per Serving): Calories 635, Fat 18g, Saturated Fat 3g, Protein 29g, Carbohydrates 94g, Fiber 14g, Cholesterol 8g, Iron 9mg, Sodium 163mg, Sugars 3g

Notes/Results: A great alternative to regular risotto when you want something a bit more nutritionally sound. Although not quite as creamy as regular risotto, the cheese does add some creaminess and you can't beat the 29 grams of protein, 9 mg of iron and 14 g of fiber in a serving. I like the intense mushroom flavor, the slight sweetness from the Marsala and leeks, and the chewy texture. It's also fairly no-fuss since there isn't the constant stirring of a normal risotto. Filling and great flavor, I would happily make it again. 

If you like non-rice risottos, Ottolenghi's Barley Risotto with Marinated Feta is one of my favorites.



You can see what mystery ingredients, recipes and chefs other participants chose for March's Mystery Box Madness Challenge by checking out the picture links on the post at the IHCC website.

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{One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take (usually) one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.}  

Happy Aloha Friday!
 

Friday, March 6, 2015

Greek Yogurt with Honeyed-Orange Flower & Saffron Syrup, Apricot Compote, and Toasted Almonds {One Photo Friday}

Smells like heaven, looks and tastes like sunshine. This is a simple Diana Henry recipe from A Change of Appetite. I have had it tagged to make since first seeing the stunning colors in the photo in the book. Zosia made it a couple of months ago and that sealed the deal. So beautifully fragrant while it's cooking with the scents of citrus, cardamom, saffron, orange flower water, warm toasted almonds, and honey wafting through the kitchen. Diana suggests it as a dessert but I ate mine first as an afternoon snack, then again the next morning, for breakfast.  


Diana Henry says, "A really simple dessert that looks beautiful. If you don't usually like saffron, try it anyway--it's quite subtle and provides much of the visual impact."

Yogurt with Honeyed Saffron Syrup, Apricot Compote, & Toasted Almonds 
Adapted from A Change of Appetite by Diana Henry
(Serves 6)

For the Compote:
2 cups dried apricot
1/3 cup apple juice
juice of 1 lemon
wide strip of lemon zest
wide strip of orange zest
1/4 cup agave syrup
crushed seeds of 8 cardamom pods

For the Honeyed Syrup:
good pinch of saffron stamens
1/2 cup honey (preferably orange blossom) (I used a local "rainbow blossom" honey)
2-3 tsp orange flower water, or taste

To Serve:
1 cup Greek Yogurt (I increased the yogurt amount to about 1/2 cup per serving)
2 Tbsp toasted slivered almonds

The night before you want to eat it, put all of the ingredients for the apricot compote into a small saucepan along with a generous 1 cup of water and bring slowly to a boil. Reduce the heat immediately to a simmer  and cook for 10-15 minutes. It's important that you keep an eye on them because some dried apricots are softer than others and you don't want them to fall apart (although it's fine if some do). Sometimes it takes 10 minutes for them to soften and plump up, sometimes a lot longer. You want to end up with fat apricots in a syrup. If the syrup is too thin (it depends on how long the apricots have cooked), remove them with a slotted spoon and boil the juices until they get thicker before returning the apricots. Let them cool in the syrup, then put it into a bowl, cover, and let stand overnight (remove the strips of zest before serving). You can keep the apricots, covered, in the refrigerator for a week. 

It's best to prepare the honey syrup the day before, too, because the saffron continues to flavor it. Put two tablespoons of boiling water into a teacup or coffee mug and add the saffron. Stir well to release the saffron's color and flavor, then add to the honey along with the orange flower water. Mix together, then cover, and let stand overnight. 

To serve, put the apricot compote into little glasses or bowls, top with some of the yogurt, then spoon the saffron honey over the top. Sprinkle with almonds and serve. 
 
The Honeyed-Orange Flower and Saffron Syrup was too pretty not to snap a picture 
of--so I suppose that it is another Two Photo Friday

Notes/Results: Such a fabulous combination of flavors--the sweet syrup and compote--full of exotic flavor, contrast nicely with the tartness of the Greek yogurt and the toasted almonds. The floral notes and saffron are clearly present but don't overpower the other ingredients. I didn't have orange blossom honey so I used a local blend called Rainbow Blossom which is a mix of different flowering trees from organic farms and rainforest sites including Mango, Avocado, Lychee, & Passion Fruit. Diana Henry says that this recipe serves six, but I think it's more like four--and that is with adding extra yogurt. So pretty to look at and enjoyable as a dessert, snack, or breakfast, I would happily make it again.


This post is linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where this week's theme is Heaven Scent--those aromatic and heavenly-smelling Diana Henry dishes. You can see what everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post at IHCC.

{One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take (usually) one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.} 

Happy Aloha Friday!

Friday, February 13, 2015

Sweet Spiced Freekeh with Chickpeas, Tomato Sauce, Yogurt and Buttery Almonds {One Photo Friday}

It's Mystery Box Madness Challenge week at I Heart Cooking Clubs where we make a dish from Diana Henry or any former IHCC chef that must include at least three mystery ingredients out of a list of ten. I had cooked Diana Henry recipes for the past MBM challenges but when freekeh was added to the  list, I immediately went to my Ottolenghi books since I knew he had a few freekeh recipes I wanted to try. (Freekeh, if you aren't familiar, is a green wheat that is roasted and has a similar texture to bulgur wheat.

I quickly found a recipe in Jerusalem that in itself included three of the ten mystery box ingredients listed below: carrots, freekeh of course, and almonds. Ottolenghi mentions that it can be served with yogurt or tomato sauce--I thought 'why not both?'--which added two more of the mystery ingredients to the mix. The only challenge left? Well, the recipe I was planning to cook was Poached Chicken with Sweet Spiced Freekeh and I don't eat meat or poultry. No matter. I do eat chickpeas and thought they would make a fabulous substitute adding some protein and extra fiber to the freekeh. 


 February's Mystery Box Madness Ingredients:

Cabbage
Mustard
*Yogurt
*Freekeh or Bulgur Wheat
Za'atar
*Tomatoes
Sausage (any kind)
*Carrots
Basil (fresh, dry, any kind)
*Almonds


Since the recipe practices the technique of poaching meat or poultry in broth and then using that broth to cook grains, I just omitted the broth-making steps, transferred the cinnamon and carrots from the poaching broth to the freekeh, and used my own garlic veggie stock. Since I changed the ingredients and method quite a bit, I am writing out the recipe below with my changes. You can take a look at the original recipe on Ottolenghi's website here. I also made a Tomato Sauce recipe from Jerusalem (the one used in Cod Cakes in Tomato Sauce) and listed that recipe below.

Sweet Spiced Freekeh
Adapted Heavily From Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi 
(Serves 2 Very Generously)

2 medium carrots, peeled and cut into slices
1 large onions
1 Tbsp olive oil

2 long cinnamon sticks
1/2 tsp paprika

1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander

1 cups cracked freekeh 
about 1 1/2 cups canned or cooked chickpeas, rinsed and drained
1 1/2 cups veggie broth
1 1/2 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/2 cup sliced almonds
salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 small bunch flat-leaf parsley 

To  Serve: Greek Yogurt and Tomato Sauce: See recipe below. 

Slice onion and carrot very thinly and place in a medium saucepan with the olive oil. Fry over medium-low heat for 12 to 15 minutes, until the onion turns golden brown and soft. Add spices and cook for a minute or two until fragrant. Add freekeh, chickpeas and veggie broth, stir, and bring to a boil. Cover pan and reduce heat to simmer. Simmer gently for about 20 minutes. Stir gently, remove from heat and let sit covered for another 20 minutes.

Remove the leaves from the parsley bunch and chop coarsely. Add it to the cooked freekeh, mixing it in with a fork. Taste for seasoning and add salt and freshly ground black pepper as needed.

When ready to serve, place butter, sliced almonds and a little salt into a small frying pan and fry until golden brown--being careful not to burn almonds. Spoon freekeh mixture into dishes or onto one platter. Top with a scoop each of Greek Yogurt and Tomato Sauce. Garnish the with buttered almonds and serve. 

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Tomato Sauce
Adapted Slightly From Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi
(Makes about 1 1/2 cups)

1 Tbsp olive oil
1 1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp sweet paprika
1 tsp ground coriander
1 medium onion, chopped
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 (14 oz) can chopped tomatoes
1 red chile, seeded and finely chopped
1 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tsp superfine sugar
salt and fresh ground black pepper

Heat olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add spices and onion and cook for 8-10 minutes, until onion is completely soft. Add white wine and simmer for about 3 minutes. Add tomatoes, chile, garlic, sugar and salt and pepper to taste. Simmer for about 15 minutes, until very thick. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed. (Note: I wanted a smoother sauce so I used the immersion blender to blend up the tomatoes and onions.) 


OK, I am going to have to re-name One Photo Friday since I snuck in another shot once again. This dish was too pretty not to see another view. ;-) 
Maybe Two Photo Friday, or iPhone Photo-Friday???

Notes/Results: I ended up extremely pleased with this dish--such great flavors and so satisfying. Warning--buttery almonds are majorly addicting--beware! But they are so worth it. The combination of the freekeh with the beans and sweet carrots with the slightly spicy warm tomato sauce, cooling Greek yogurt and crunchy, buttery almonds is fabulous. As mentioned, the carrots and cinnamon were originally in the poaching broth for the chicken that the freekeh is cooked in--but I am glad I included them in cooking of the freekeh for their sweeter notes. The original recipe also included allspice in the freekeh. I am just not a big fan of the flavor so I subbed in ground cumin instead. If you eat chicken, try Ottolenghi's original recipe--I am sure it is fabulous. If you want a vegan dish, leave off the yogurt and toast the almonds in oil or non-dairy margarine and you are all set. But for me, I loved how my changes made this dish turn out and I would definitely make it again.   

You can see what mystery ingredients, recipes and chefs other participants chose for February's Mystery Box Madness Challenge by checking out the picture links on the post at the IHCC website.


{One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take (usually) one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.} 

Happy Aloha Friday!

Friday, February 6, 2015

Eastern Salmon Carpaccio: A Little Fresh and Vibrant Fusion {One Photo Friday}

Fusion, when it works, is a wonderful thing. This Eastern Salmon Carpaccio from A Change of Appetite by Diana Henry blends Asian ingredients with the classic Italian dish/preparation of thinly-sliced raw meat or fish. The result is fresh, vibrant, healthy, and pretty much addicting. 


Eastern Salmon Carpaccio
Adapted from A Change of Appetite by Diana Henry
(Serves 6 as an Appetizer)

1 1/4 lb spanking fresh skinless salmon fillet
1/4 cup cilantro leaves
6 basil leaves
about 12 mint leaves
1/2 small red onion, finely sliced, almost shaved
1 cup Japanese Carrot & Daikon Salad (recipe below)
3 Tbsp Vietnamese Dipping Sauce (recipe below)
lime wedges to serve
(I added toasted coconut chips to serve)

Using a sharp knife, slice the salmon finely, as if you were slicing smoked salmon. Put it onto a serving plate, or onto individual plates.

Tear and sprinkle the herb leaves over the top. Spoon the carrot and daikon salad on top and sprinkle with red onion.

Spoon the dipping sauce on top and serve with lime wedges. 

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Japanese Carrot & Daikon Salad
Adapted from A Change of Appetite by Diana Henry
(Serves 4-6)

1 cup rice vinegar
3 Tbsp super-fine sugar (I reduced by 1/2)
2 daikon radishes (about 1 1/2 lb)
12 carrots (about 1 1/2 lbs)
(I added cucumber)
1 1/2 tsp salt

Heat the vinegar and sugar together gently in a saucepan, stirring a little to help the sugar dissolve. Let cool completely.

Peel and trim the daikon and carrots, keeping them separate, and cut into matchstick-sized pieces (I just used my julienne peeler.) Put them into colanders. Mix 1 tsp salt into the daikon and 1/2 tsp into the carrot, mixing it well with your hands. Let stand for 10 minutes and squeeze out excess water from both.

Put both vegetables into a clean bowl and mix in the sweet vinegar mixture. Keep in the refrigerator and serve nice and cold. It will keep about five days. 

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Vietnamese Dipping Sauce
Adapted from A Change of Appetite by Diana Henry

1 red chile, chopped, or to taste (I used 1 Tbsp Sriracha)
1 garlic clove, crushed
2 Tbsp lime juice, or to taste
1/4 cup Thai fish sauce
5 tsp superfine sugar, or to taste (I reduced by 1/2)  
 
Pound together chile and garlic and gradually add the lime juice, fish sauce, and sugar. Taste for seasoning and heat and adjust as needed. Add water if sauce is too strong. 


OK, I cheated and took a second iPhone photo (See One Photo Friday explanation below) because I covered up most of the lovely salmon on the plate with the herbs and veggies. ;-) So I guess it's Two Photo Friday today!)

Notes/Results: I know some people cringe at the thought of raw fish but if you can get good fish and want to give it a try, carpaccio or ceviche are always a great way to go. You can put on extra dressing and lime juice and wait a few minutes before eating it and it will *cook* more. If you are a raw fish lover like me, you will likely love this dish. Such great fresh flavors--herby, tangy, sweet and a little bit hot. The texture of the picked vegetable with the smooth, velvety salmon is nice too. I have become slightly obsessed with topping different dishes with toasted coconut chips and I love the crunch and sweet coconut flavor they add. I just used 1 small fresh salmon fillet and made about 1/3 of the recipe. I also cut down the amounts of the daikon & carrot salad and dipping sauce recipes too (and reduced the sugar in the recipes). This carpaccio is very colorful and pretty on the plate! All the elements were delicious and I will make them combined or individually again. 

This post is linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where it is East Meets West week--with fusion dishes from Diana Henry. You can see what everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post.


{One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.} 

 

Friday, December 26, 2014

Smoked Trout and Leek Risotto {One Photo Friday}

I love risotto. The creamy indulgent comfort. Even the making of it--the zen of ladling and stirring for 20 to 30 minutes and waiting for the 'magic' to happen. I usually use that stirring time to clear my head and think of nothing but I was caught up in the middle of this suspenseful mystery/thriller and spent my risotto-making time with my Kindle in one hand, the spoon in the other. (E-readers are made for risotto stirring.)  


A Diana Henry smoked fish and leek risotto recipe from Roast Figs Sugar Snow: Food to Warm the Soul has been tempting me for a while. Henry uses smoked haddock but I chose the easier to find smoked trout. The combination of smoky fish, sweet leeks and creamy rice sounded good and perfect for a slightly indulgent holiday week meal. I cut the recipe down a bit and made a couple of small changes noted in red below. 

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Diana Henry says, "I don't usually like inauthentic dishes that fuse a technique from one country's cuisine with ingredients from another, but occasionally it works, and it does here. I'd even expect Italians to like this. Try not to break the smoked fish up too much--you want to find chunks of it among the rice, not tiny flakes.

Smoked Trout and Leek Risotto 
Adapted from Roast Figs Sugar Snow by Diana Henry
(Serves 4-6)

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter (I used about 1/8 cup)
4 medium leeks finely sliced
1 lb (450g) smoked haddock or other smoked fish (I used 8 oz smoked trout)
4 1/4 cups light chicken or vegetable stock (I used 5 cups low-sodium no-chicken broth)
10 1/2 oz (300g) aborio rice (I used 1 2/3 cups)
3 oz (75g) freshly-grated Parmesan (I used 2 oz Parmigiano-Reggiano)

Melt butter in a large heavy-bottomed saucepan pan and sweat the leeks in it for 15 minutes. Remove skin from fish and cut into small chunks and set aside. Bring stock to a simmer in a separate pot.

Add the rice to the leeks. Stir and cook for about a minute, making sure the rice is well coated with the buttery juices. Begin adding hot stock, a ladleful at a time stirring constantly. Don't add new liquid until each ladleful has been absorbed. The rice will become sticky and creamy as it cooks and it should take about 20 minutes to become soft while retaining a little bite in the center. (Note: I used 5 cups of broth and about 28 minutes to get the risotto to my liking--ultra creamy but still a small 'bite' in the center of the rice.)

When risotto is cooked to your liking, stir in about 2 tablespoons of the Parmesan and the chunks of smoked fish. Check seasoning--it's unlikely to need any salt because of the saltiness of the cheese and fish, but a good grind of pepper will finish it off. Serve topped with the remaining Parmesan and a sprinkle of chopped fresh parsley if desired.
 
Notes/Results: Rich, creamy and full of flavor. The smoked cheese paired well with the slightly salty Parmigiano-Reggiano and the leeks kept it from being too salty. I generally take more time and liquid to make my risotto. In the recipe, Henry says about 20 minutes--I took mine to about 28 minutes and used extra broth. Also, in the recipe the smoked haddock is poached before it is added to the dish but I didn't see a reason or need for that with the trout so I omitted that step. The dish made me happy so I quickly snapped one photo with my iPhone and dug in. I would make this again.


This post is linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where it is Potluck week. The chance to make any Diana Henry recipe or a recipe from any previous IHCC chef. You can see what everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post when it goes live.

{One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.}
 

Friday, November 14, 2014

Moroccan-Inspired Sweet Potato Hummus: A Simple Healthy + Delicious Recipe {One Photo Friday}

Here's a confession... I am not a big fan of sweet potatoes. Nutritionally, I can fully get behind them as they are so chock full of vitamins A and C, antioxidants, and a plethora of other nutrients. But flavor-wise, not so much. I think it's the sweetness that my taste buds try to tell me doesn't below in anything labeled potato. But, I have a habit of buying random vegetables and other healthy foods that I am not particularly fond of and challenging myself to find a way to like, maybe even grove to love them--in a way that doesn't involved deep-frying. ;-) This creamy, full-of-wonderful-Moroccan-inspired-flavors hummus might just be the ticket to me loving my sweet potatoes.


This hummus came from a happy accident. I steamed a lonely sweet potato that I needed to use up and was trying to decide how to enjoy it more. I had some homemade hummus that I had spiced up with a combination of sumac, cumin, and smoked paprika, so I slapped some on top of the sweet potato and sprinkled on toasted pumpkin seeds for crunch and thought "Hey, that's pretty good!" I thought it would be even better mixed into the hummus, and with some harissa for a bit of kick so I bought another sweet potato and hit the spice rack.  

It turned out to be fabulous--I think I like it even better than my Sunny Carrot Hummus because of its slightly spicy and smoky flavors. A great, vibrantly-colored, and healthy appetizer to put out for holiday parties. 
 
Moroccan-Inspired Sweet Potato
By Deb, Kahakai Kitchen
(Makes About 3 Cups)

1 sweet potato (roughly a pound), steamed until soft*
1 (15 oz) can chickpeas (low-sodium), rinsed and drained
3 cloves garlic
2 tsp cumin
1 1/2 tsp sumac
1 1/2 tsp harissa (spice or paste), or to taste
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
salt and black pepper to taste
juice of 1 lemon, or to taste
1 tsp sesame oil  
1/4 cup olive oil
1/4 to 1/3 cup ice water

Place all ingredients except ice water into a food processor and process until smooth, adding ice water as needed to get good consistency. Taste for seasoning and adjust as needed. Serve with raw veggies of choice. (I like minis--kirby cucumbers, tiny carrots and baby bell peppers.)
 
(*Sweet Potato Note: I usually steam mine in the microwave because I am lazy. I wash the potato well, cut it into 1-inch cubes and put in a microwave-safe bowl with a Tablespoon of water and cover. I check after 7 or 8 minutes but it can take 10 or more depending on the microwave. It should be soft enough to mash easily. Let potato cool and remove skin.)

{One Photo Friday: Since I normally drag out my big camera and gear, take a bunch of photos of my recipes, and then spend time obsessing over them--I decided that for Fridays, I'll simplify by posting a recipe or something interesting and then just take one photo of it with my iPhone--no muss/no fuss.}

Happy Aloha Friday!