Showing posts with label Nigel Slater. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Nigel Slater. Show all posts

Sunday, May 12, 2019

Kerala Fish Stew with Lime and Curry Leaves (and Potatoes & Peas) for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

I stopped by Whole Foods the other night to drop something off to my friend and we ended up shopping together. Since I knew I would be making an Indian dish this week for I Heart Cooking Clubs, I checked the local produce aisle to see if they had any fresh curry leaves and ended up with a large bag. Luckily, Natalie took some from me because, although they can be dried or frozen, they are always better fresh.


I looked to Madhur Jaffrey for a soup recipe that used curry leaves but ended up going with a Kerala Fish Stew with Lime and Curry Leaves from Nigel Slater. I liked the combination of the cardamom, lime and curry leaves. I did make a couple of changes, adding some small potatoes and frozen peas (I have been craving samosas I guess!) and adding more broth and coconut milk to make it soupier. I used two kinds of local fish, kajiki and shutome--both mild, firm white fish that held up well. 


Nigel Slater says, “Curry leaves, coriander, coconut, tamarind and limes. These are the tart, cooling flavours you expect further east, yet a Keralan fish stew may be scented with them all. The fish in the market is good enough, the usual Indian blue-grey pomfret, giant eel and the area's famous prawns - after all we are not far from the sea - but we can do better. Down by the sea, past the fishing boats at Cochin, you can also buy it from the boats down by the harbour in Cochin.

Kerala Fish Stew
Slightly adapted from Nigel Slater via TheGuardian.com
(Feeds 4 to 6)

750g (about 1.5 lbs) mixed fish, such as haddock, mullet (I used local kajiki {blue marlin} and shutome (broadbill swordfish)
a little turmeric
juice of a lime
3 Tbsp of coconut, vegetable or groundnut oil
an onion, peeled and finely chopped
4 large, or 6 small green chillies, seeded and finely chopped
4 cloves of garlic, peeled and crushed
a piece of ginger as big as your thumb, peeled and finely grated
6 green cardamoms
20 fresh curry leaves

(I added about 1 lb small yellow potatoes, sliced)
(I added 2 cups light veggie stock)
(I added 1 cup frozen peas, thawed)
400ml tin (15 oz can)  coconut milk (I used 2 cans)
rice to serve

Rinse the fish, taking care to remove any loose scales or bones. Pat it dry with kitchen paper, put it in a shallow dish and dust with a couple of pinches of turmeric and the same of salt. Squeeze over the lime juice and set aside for half an hour or so.

Heat the oil in a large, shallow pan, adding the onion as it warms. Cook over a low to moderate heat until the onion is soft, stirring from time to time, then add the chillies, garlic and ginger, continuing till all has softened.

Break open the cardamom pods, crush the seeds slightly, and add them to the onion mixture with the curry leaves. Stir in the coconut milk and an equal amount of water. Simmer for 8-10 minutes, making sure it does not boil. (It will curdle if it does.)

Cut the fish into large, meaty chunks then slide them into the sauce. Let it cook gently, barely bubbling, until tender and easily parted from its skin or bone. This will take about 4 or 5 minutes depending on the thickness and variety of your fish. Taste for seasoning, adding more lime juice or salt as you wish.


Notes/Results: I really love this soup, the curry and cardamon give it an exotic flavor--not curry, but fragrant and aromatic, while the lime, chilies and coconut give it an almost Thai vibe. I used three large jalapenos and seeded, it was just spicy enough for me without overpowering the dish. I forgot to make rice, so served it with a microwave lime-coconut rice.I will happily make this again.


Linking up with I Heart Cooking Clubs for Cuisine Spotlight: Indian!

 
Let's take a look in the in the Souper Sundays kitchen.


Debra of Eliot's Eats shared this Quick Salad, inspired by By Invitation Only by Dorthea Benton Frank. She says, "Being the only cook in the family, Shelby brings “two bags of prewashed romaine lettuce to make a salad, with cherry tomatoes and a container of mini-mozzarella balls in water” (176). On the following page, she describes her recipe. ... This salad, however, was a great light Sunday lunch for us. I paired it with some balsamic-butter toasted pretzel buns. (More about that butter later—I’m still perfecting it.)"
 


Tina of Squirrel Head Manor shared her Kitchen Clean Out Salad, saying "This salad is from scavenging in the fridge.  Best soups and salads come out from those forages. Here I used butter lettuce, some baby spinach, cucumber, chopped yellow bell pepper, grape tomatoes and a bit of rotisserie chicken. This was hauled off to lunch as I am still dragging myself in for a bit longer. While I enjoy lunch I prop up my Kindle and read. The life of a Government Drone."


Thanks to Debra and Tina for joining in this week!

About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 
If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...
 

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:
  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up to Souper Sundays in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (completely optional).
You are invited to the Inlinkz link party!
Click here to enter

Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Sunday, September 23, 2018

Chickpea, Summer Squash & Pepper Stew with Pesto: Easy Nigel Slater Comfort for Souper (Soup, Salad, & Sammie) Sundays

Fall started this weekend, though you wouldn't know that from the weather. It is very warm and humid here and will be for the week but, lucky for me I work in a very air-conditioned office, making this vegan Chickpea, Summer Squash & Pepper Stew perfect for lunch. The veggie choice too--the summer squash and red pepper, plus the pesto (make or use a vegan version if you want to) on top, make this a good transition dish for the two seasons.


I slightly adapted a Nigel Slater recipe, doubling the chickpeas and making it somewhat more brothy to make it last for a few lunches. His simple recipe sketch from The Guardian is below with my changes in red.


Chickpea, Summer Squash & Pepper Stew with Pesto
Slightly Adapted from Nigel Slater via TheGuardian.com
(Serves 4

The Recipe:
Peel one red and one yellow onion and slice them as finely as you can. Warm a couple of tablespoons of olive oil in a large, deep frying pan, then add the chopped onions. Cut one large Romano pepper (I used a red bell pepper + one pinch Aleppo pepper) into bite-sized pieces, removing any seeds and the core as you do it, then add the chunks to the onion and leave it to soften over a moderate heat.

Slice one large green and one large yellow courgette into slices not much thicker than a pound coin, then add the courgette to the onion and pepper in the pan and cook for 15 minutes or so, until soft. 

Rinse the contents of a 400g can of chickpeas (I used two 15oz cans), then stir into the vegetables and season carefully with salt and pepper. (Since I wanted to eat it as a soup/stew, I added 2 cups of light vegetable stock.) When all is warm and bubbling, serve in deep bowls, a trickle of oil over the surface of each, and eat with chewy sourdough bread.

The Trick:
If your courgettes produce too thin a juice, then turn up the heat and let the liquid reduce by half. It won’t thicken, but the flavours will concentrate. Good though this is, I rather like it piled on to toasted foccacia or ciabatta.


The Twist:
It is the sweet pan juices that make this dish worth making. Intensify them with a little garlic, basil leaves, a trickle of balsamic vinegar, a few capers or thyme leaves, or perhaps you would prefer a spoonful of basil pesto. You can also use this as a rough and ready pasta sauce, and fold in a few handfuls of cooked penne.


Notes/Results: This is a case of when a good soup--nice simple flavors and textures, goes to great with the addition of a topping or stir-in. The pesto (you can use store-bought or homemade) really adds that special touch and makes the veggies and beans sing. If you are eating bread, a piece would not be remiss here, but it is also fine without. I would happily make it again.


Linking this stew up to I Heart Cooking Clubs for Potluck Week. Our chance to make any recipe from our current or past IHCC chefs.


Lets take a look into the Souper Sundays kitchen:


Judee of Gluten Free A-Z Blog shared her Instant Pot or Not Cholent (Bean Stew) and said, "If you like beans, you will LOVE this amazing vegan cholent/chulent recipe that is made with a mixture of pinto beans, red kidney beans, and navy beans. The Instant Pot transforms an ancient recipe into modern times. ... Chulent or cholent is a old traditional Sabbath day meal that has been made for centuries by observant Jews. (Cholent recipes can be traced back to 1180 in Vienna). ... The word cholent is thought to be derived from the Medieval French word "chaud" meaning hot and "lent" meaning slow. Thus a slow cooking hot meal."


Shaheen of Allotment2Kitchen shared this pasta salad and said "This Black Tapenade Cherry Tomato Pasta Salad is perhaps one of the laziest pasta salad recipes I have ever made - other than cooking the pasta, the rest was a breeze. ... I had made the black olive tapenade a few days back to go with the homemade sourdough bread. So was looking for other ways to use it up. So I ended up cooking some penne pasta. I threw in a good handful of red and golden yellow cherry tomatoes and lunch for work was made."


Mahalo to Judee and Shaheen for joining in this week!
 
About Souper Sundays:

Souper Sundays (going since 2008) now has a format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches at any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's Souper Sunday's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:

  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you. Also please see below for what to do on your blog post that you link up her in order to be included in the weekly round-up.
and 

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • Mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post. (Not to be a pain but it's polite and only fair to link back to events you link up at--so if you link a post up here without linking back to it on your post, it will be removed.)
  • You are welcome to add the Souper Sundays logo to your post and/or blog (optional).



Have a happy, healthy week!
 

Friday, November 10, 2017

Nigel Slater's Winter Salad of Pears and Blue Cheese & Seven Other Favorite Apple and Pear Recipes

I am aware that this Winter Salad of Pears and Blue Cheese looks ready for Christmas with the red and green colors (not helped by my using red napkins) and it isn't quite Thanksgiving yet, but I needed a pear recipe and was craving salad and blue cheese and it gave me an excuse to buy my first gorgeous pomegranate of the season. This Nigel Slater recipe ends up being a good trial run for any holiday meal and paired well with a piece of salmon for a Friday night dinner.


Nigel says that slightly under-ripe pears with a little crispness are better for this than truly ripe ones--the contrast works well with the cheese. I made a few small changes to the recipe based on what I like and had on hand, noted in red below.


Winter Salad of Pears and Blue Cheese
Slightly Adapted from Ripe: A Cook in the Orchard  by Nigel Slater
(Serves 2 or More as a Side)

a plump pear, ripe but still slightly crisp
lemon juice
small, crisp salad leaves--a couple of handfuls. (I used baby arugula)
firm blue cheese, four thick slices (I used a Gorgonzola--in pieces)
walnut halves, a handful, toasted
1/2 pomegranate, seeds separated   

Dressing:
cider vinegar or white vinegar--1 Tbsp (I used champagne vinegar)
peanut oil--1 Tbsp (I used mac nut oil)
walnut or hazelnut oil--2 Tbsp (I used mac nut oil with a tiny bit of sesame oil)
heavy cream--1 Tbsp

Slice the pear into quarters. Remove the core and cut the fruit into thin slices. Brush each piece with lemon juice. 

Make the dressing by putting the vinegar in a small bowl and dissolving a pinch of sea salt in it. Stir in the oils and then the cream, whisking well. 

Divide the salad greens, pear slices and cheese between two plates and pour over the dressing. Scatter the toasted walnuts and pomegranate seeds over the salad and serve.
  

Notes/Results: My favorite Nigel Slater salad recipe (featuring apples) is shown below and remains in my heart, but this is a lovely and tasty salad too and one I will happily make again. The combination of the peppery baby arugula with the sweet pears, slightly tangy dressing, soft blue cheese, toasty walnuts and gorgeous juicy little pomegranate arils all work together so well. This was a round and mellow Gorgonzola which I prefer to a sharper blue cheese and if blue cheese isn't your thing, you could sub in feta and it would be delightful. Salmon, cooked simply in a bit of oil, was a great pairing as it has a strong enough flavor to hold up to the salad. An easy and delicious Friday night dinner. 


Linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs for the Monthly Featured Ingredient Challenge: Apples and/or Pears. You can see what apple and pear recipes everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post.


And linking up to Souper Sundays here at Kahakai Kitchen. Each Sunday we feature delicious soups, salads, and sandwiches from friends around the blogosphere--please join in if you have any to share. Here's this week's post and linkup

 

For our Monthly Featured Ingredient Challenge, it's fun to go back and look at some of the Apple and Pear recipes I have cooked with our IHCC Featured Chefs. Here are some favorites with links to their respective posts and recipes. (Excuse some of the photos--many of these are from my early blogging days!)

My VERY FAVORITE Apple Recipe: Nigel Slater's Pan-Fried Apple and Cheese Salad. If you have never had warm, pan-fried apples on a salad, making the cheese slightly melted, you owe it to yourself to try this. I make it as often as I can each fall.

 
And Other Favorite Apple and Pear Dishes from our IHCC Chefs:
 
Nigella's Pear and Ginger Muffins:

 
Giada's Apple and Thyme Martinis: 


Giada's Smoked Salmon and Apple Carpaccio: 

 
Madhur Jaffrey's Pears Poached in a Saffron Syrup (Zaafraani Nashpati) 

  
Curtis Stone's Lemon Puddings with Granny Smith Apple Compote:


Mark Bittman's Apple Cider and Calvados Slushy:


Happy Aloha Friday!

Thursday, March 30, 2017

The Book Tour Stops Here: A Review of "Every Wild Heart" by Meg Donohue, Served with a Recipe for Simple Pasta with Butter and Parmesan

On today's TLC Book Tour stop I'm reviewing the mother-daughter novel Every Wild Heart by Meg Donohue and along with my review, I'm serving up a bowl of simple Pasta with Butter and Parmesan, inspired by my reading.


Publisher's Blurb: 

From USA Today bestselling author Meg Donohue comes a mystery, a love story, and a mother-daughter tale about two women on a precarious journey to uncover their true selves.

Passionate and funny, radio personality Gail Gideon is a true original. Nine years ago when Gail’s husband announced that he wanted a divorce, her ensuing on-air rant propelled her local radio show into the national spotlight. Now, “The Gail Gideon Show” is beloved by millions of single women who tune-in for her advice on the power of self-reinvention. But fame comes at a price. After all, what does a woman who has staked her career on being single do when she finds herself falling in love? And is the person who is harassing her in increasingly troubling ways a misguided fan or a true danger to Gail and her daughter, Nic?

Fourteen-year-old Nic has always felt that she pales in comparison to her vibrant, outgoing mother. Plagued by a fear of social situations, she is most comfortable at the stable where she spends her afternoons. But when a riding accident lands Nic in the hospital, she awakens from her coma changed. Suddenly, she has no fear at all and her disconcerting behavior lands her in one risky situation after another. And no one, least of all her mother, can guess what she will do next…

Hardcover: 304 pages  
Publisher: William Morrow (March 14, 2017)


My Review:

Although I have had How to Eat a Cupcake sitting in my TBR pile for ages, Every Wild Heart is my first book from Meg Donohue, although it will not be my last. It is an easy read, not too heavy, and full of warmth, love and humor. Although there is certainly some drama and a touch of suspense in the mix, it is a mostly feel-good story about the relationship between a single mother (Gail) and her fourteen-year-old daughter (Nic) and the changes that they and their relationship go through after Nic has a riding accident. The story is told in dual narration with chapters alternating  between the two characters, each offering their perspectives. 

At first I was worried that there were a lot of sub-plots with Gail's career indecision, a angry 'fan' who seems to be stalking her, potential romances for both Nic and Gail, Nic's accident, and the horse riding and music (there's a great playlist in the back of the book) that are woven in throughout the story, but Donohue fairly masterfully fits its it all in and makes it work. It makes for a balanced and engaging book that while didn't deliver quite as much suspense as I was expecting from the blurb, certainly delivered in entertainment as there was just enough drama, romance, tense moments, and relationship/family drama to keep me turning the pages to find out what happened next. At it's core, Every Wild Heart is about growth, change, and moving forward despite our fears of letting go, as well as the changing relationship (but unconditional love) between a mother and daughter. It's a definite comfort read and manages to be sweet and thoughtful without being cloying. My only complaint? I would have liked more than 304 pages with these characters.

-----

Author Notes: Meg Donohue is the USA Today bestselling author of How to Eat a Cupcake, All the Summer Girls, and Dog Crazy. She has an MFA in creative writing from Columbia University and a BA in comparative literature from Dartmouth College. Born and raised in Philadelphia, she now lives in San Francisco with her husband, three children, and dog.
 
Find out more about Meg at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

-----

Food Inspiration:

There is no a lot of food in Every Wild Heart but there is mention enough to provide some inspiration, like a turkey-and-cheese sandwich, a kale, farro, and chia seed salad, plates of spaghetti, the meatball subs and tacos to be avoided in the school cafeteria--because of the "weird spice in it that makes your mouth feel kind of furry the rest of the day," cereal, doughnuts, comforting meals of pasta and stew, bagels and cream cheese, pizza and Kentucky Mules, chocolate and coffee.

It was homemade pasta cooked by stable owner Denny for Gail that became my book-inspired dish. Denny invites her over for a spaghetti dinner and they end up making homemade pasta (a "hobby" of his).

"Two minutes later, he pulled the pasta from the water with tongs and spun it around in a large porcelain bowl with a few hunks of butter, a sprinkle of parsley and black pepper, and a healthy spoonful of Parmesan cheese. The pasta was still steaming as he portioned it into two bowls and set them on the table.  ... The pasta was so good that we were forced to eat in silence for a full minute before either of us could say another word."


It sounded like one of my favorite "the world sucks right now and I have no energy and need some serious comfort food" go-to dinners based off a Nigel Slater recipe sketch. I don't make my own pasta and usually opt for pantry-handy boxed spaghetti--but in honor of Denny, I sprang for fresh linguine for this one.


Linguine with Butter and Parmesan 
Adapted from Appetite by Nigel Slater

"For each person, grate 1/2 cup Parmesan or pecorino. I know this will look like a lot, but generosity is the only route to take here. Toss the hot pasta with a thick slice of your freshest butter (you really should open a new packet for this, as the sweetness of the butter is the whole point) and the grated cheese. The two will melt into a thin sauce that will lightly coat the spaghetti. Spoon over more cheese at the table--or on the floor or the sofa or in bed, or wherever else you might be eating this.

(Deb's Note: I have made a couple of small changes to this recipe--I cook the pasta in salted water and reserve about 1/4 cup of the pasta cooking water and toss it in with the grated cheese and butter. It thins it out just a bit and makes the sauce coat the pasta more effectively. Then I also add a good amount of freshly ground black pepper and here I've adding some chopped fresh parsley--not needed necessarily but it was in the book and makes it look prettier.)


Notes/Results: Simple but so decadent and so good. It's hard to tell from the photos but between the butter, Parmesan and pasta water, each strand is coated with a thin sauce of goodness. With the amount of cheese and butter Nigel recommends, this isn't the healthiest pasta dish, but boy does it comfort and restore a weary body and soul when you need it to. I make this periodically when I need a bit of an easy boost--it's an occasional necessary indulgence. ;-)


I'm linking this post up to the Weekend Cooking event at Beth Fish Reads, a weekly event that is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share. For more information, see the welcome post.

 
Note: A review copy of the "Every Wild Heart" was provided to me by the publisher, Harper Collins, and TLC Book Tours. I was not compensated for this review and as always, my thoughts and opinions are my own.

You can see the stops for the rest of this TLC Book Tour and what other reviewers thought about the book here.

 

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Nigel Slater's Tomato, Fennel and Cod Soup: A Unique Fish Soup for Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammie) Sundays

This is a two-fish-dish week. I'm both working through some frozen fish and trying to add a little more protein to my diet this week. I had a bit over a pound of wild cod in the freezer and had been wanting to try this Tomato Fish Broth recipe from Nigel Slater in the The Guardian. I like unusual flavor combination and the combination of the fish, fennel, tomato and mushroom with the olives, pickles, dill and sour cream sounded tempting. 


I think dill can be a polarizing ingredient that people either love or hate (my sisters both detest it while I adore it) but if you do enjoy it, you will likely love this soup which has wonderful and unique flavor. I made a few changes to the recipe--noted in red below. It was perfect--light but warming for a cool breezy weekend.


Nigel says, "It was intriguing to come across a soup seasoned with sour ingredients. The version I ate in Helsinki was made with what they call pike-perch, but any sustainable white-fleshed fish that holds together well can be used." 

Tomato Fish Broth
Adapted from Nigel Slater via TheGuardian.com
(Serves 4 to 6)

onions: 2 medium (I used sweet yellow onions)
olive oil
garlic: 1 clove (I used 2)
tomatoes: 5 medium-sized
fennel: 1 small bulb
button mushrooms: a couple of handfuls
water or vegetable stock: 1 litre or 4 cups (I increased the amount for a brothier soup & used 3 cups shrimp stock & 3 cups light, low-sodium veggie broth)
gherkins: 2 medium-sized  (I used 5 baby dills + some juice) 

(I added 1 Tbsp capers)
olives: 16 (I used
Picholine green olives)
(I added about 1/4 cup of tiny pickled sweet red peppers)
parsley: a few sprigs
dill: 3 bushy sprigs
white fish fillets: 500g (about 1 1/4 lbs) (I used cod)
sour cream 4-6 tbsp (I used kefir labne--yogurt cheese)


Peel and roughly chop the onions. Soften them in a little olive oil in a heavy-based pan over a moderate heat. Peel and crush the garlic and add to the onions. Roughly chop the tomatoes and add to the pan. Let them cook to a slush with the onions. 


Finely slice the fennel and mushrooms and add to the pan. Cook for a few minutes until the fennel has started to soften a little. Pour in the water or stock and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer for 20 minutes, adding salt and black pepper.

Slice the gherkins, stone and halve the olives, chop the parsley and dill and set aside. Lower the fish into the stock and cook for 3 or 4 minutes until the fish is just opaque. Stir the gherkins, olives, parsley and dill into the soup. Correct the seasoning and, if you wish, add a little of the liquid from the gherkin jar. Ladle into warm bowls and add a spoonful of soured cream to each.
 

Notes/Results: I really love this soup which is unique in flavor profile and quite delicious when it is all combined together. The sour, tangy bites of the pickles, olives, dill and capers, along with the yogurt take the simple tomato-fennel-onion-cod combination to another level. I used good broth--some homemade shrimp stock and some good low-sodium veggie stock base and added some of the optional pickle juice which gave it a nice depth of flavor. The added tiny red pickled peppers were mainly added for color and the capers because I love them but they added to the mix. The kefir labne made a great substitution to sour cream and adds protein and probiotics with a great tangy flavor when stirred into the mix, but you can used the sour cream or crème fraîche or even plain yogurt. The only thing missing was some good bread that I forgot to buy to soak up the extra broth. I would definitely make this again.


This post is linking up to I Heart Cooking Clubs where the coming week is our February Potluck--our chance to make any recipe from our current chef Heidi Swanson, or any of our previous IHCC featured chefs. You can see what everyone made by checking out the picture links on the post.


We have some good friends with delicious dishes waiting in the Souper Sundays kitchen from last week--let's have a look!


Ali of Fix Me a little Lunch shared Macadamia Lemon Shrimp Salad and said, "I’ve been curious about the whole Whole 30 thing – by and large, minus the carbs, cheese and dairy, Clay and I eat a pretty healthy diet.  However, my lunches have been a little decadent here of late (I’m blaming the weather and the need for comfort food).  As spring is finally starting to peek around the corner, I think I’m ready for some healthier lunches.  So this week’s recipe is my inspired #FoodBlogerLove salad, which is Whole 30, quick, easy and definitely healthy."



Tina of Squirrel Head Manor tried Ina Garten's Pea Soup that she described as "more like pea sludge." She said, "No matter how much broth I added it would absorb.  Like pancakes soak up syrup........it became a sludge.  Yes, I did eat it and bless his heart, my supportive husband ate it too. It tasted fairly good considering the texture was like hummus. We had to use bread to scoop it, like hummus, rather than soaking up the non-existent broth.  Too weird.  Why am I sharing this dumpster fire of a meal?  Because we learn from mistakes in the kitchen and I know I don't want to make this recipe again."



Debra of Eliot's Eats shared Lentil Soup with Chorizo inspired by a recent book review. She said, "I wanted to make that lentil soup that she and her skiing partner ate for every lunch while in Cerro Catedral (Patagonia).  The ate so much of this soup their “pee started to smell weird.” (That’s a great endorsement to make this soup, don’t you think?  My motivation came from her description that it was sooooo good that they ate it every day.) This is a hearty dish and I would eat it everyday for lunch as well if I could."



Here at Kahakai Kitchen I made Scrambled Egg Sandwiches with Sriracha-Garlic Mayo for a recent book review. I love egg sandwiches and the Sriracha-Garlic Mayo is my adaptation of a spicy garlic aioli that is served on avocado toast at my favorite local coffee shop. It went well with the eggs and took the basic sandwich to a new level. 

  
Mahalo to everyone who joined in this week! 

Souper Sundays is back with a new format of a picture link each week where anyone interested can post their soups, salads, or sandwiches any time during the week and I post a recap of the entries the following week.)

(If you aren't familiar with Souper Sundays, you can read about of the origins of it here.
 

If you would like to join in Souper (Soup, Salad, and Sammie) Sundays, I would love to have you! Here's how...

To join in this week's linkup with your soup, salad or sandwich:

  • Link up your soup (stew, chili, soupy curries, etc. are fine), salad, or sandwich dish, (preferably one from the current week or month--but we'll take older posts too) on the picture link below and leave a comment on this post so I am sure not to miss you.

On your entry post (on your blog):
  • please mention Souper (Soup, Salad & Sammies) Sundays at Kahakai Kitchen and link back to this post.
  • you are welcome to add the wonderful Souper Sundays logo (created by Ivy at Kopiaste) to your post and/or blog (optional).


 
 Have a happy, healthy week!